Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology

About Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology

The Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology houses over 30,000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, and maps. Images document archaeological work throughout Indiana and the region from the 1920s through the present day, including excavations at Angel Mounds and other significant sites. They also record notable figures such as Glenn Black and Eli Lilly along with many dedicated workers and students who have contributed to the GBL and the development of professional archaeology in Indiana. Other items include images of selected archaeological artifacts from the repository and ethnohistory maps from the archival collections. More information about the history of the GBL, the collections, and visiting the museum can be found at http://gbl.indiana.edu/.

For more information, visit the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology.

Collections

GBL Photographs

Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology Photographs

Explore the lab’s archaeological photograph collection. Images depict historic excavations through modern day field work, historic and prehistoric artifact collections housed at the museum, as well as the people and research work of the Glenn Black Lab over the years. This collection will continue to expand as additional materials are digitized. For more information, visit the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology.

GBL Ethnohistory Map Collection

Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology Ethnohistory Map Collection

This collection consists of the Maps Series of The Great Lakes-Ohio Valley Ethnohistory Collection, 1953-1966, a unique assemblage of primary and secondary resources pertaining to the Native American occupancy of the region. These maps and other items were assembled to support the Great Lakes-Ohio Valley Ethnohistory Project. This U.S. Department of Justice funded research activity was responsible for the preparation of in-depth reports concerning American Indian land use and tenure. These reports were intended to be used in the government's defense against cases involving alleged treaty inequities and which were brought before the Indian Claims Commission, a body and a process authorized by federal legislation signed into law on August 13, 1946.