Hurricane Gloria

September 16-October 2, 1985

Perspective view for Gloria

About this image

Hurricane Gloria ranks as the 13th costliest and the 16th most intense hurricane at time of U.S. landfall this century. Gloria first passed over Cape Hatteras, North Carolina on September 27 as a category 3 storm. Moving at more than 30 mph, it made landfall again over southern Long Island, New York as a category 2 storm. Economic losses were estimated at $900 million.


Ocean Turbidity

Unfortunately, Cape Hatteras, North Carolina was under clouds in the after image although the offshore turbidity signal is apparently not as high as that subsequent to hurricane Emily that also brushed this area in 1993. It is important to note that this after image is actually four days following the passing of hurricane Gloria. Noticeably more turbid waters are found in the shallow Chesapeake and Delaware Bay areas perhaps in part due to increased outflow from the Potomac and Delaware Rivers. The difference image reveals an overall increase in turbidity in the bays and nearshore regions.

Turbidity before Gloria Turbidity after Gloria Turbidity difference for Gloria

Before
After
Difference (after minus before)


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Sea Surface Temperature

No dramatic changes are apparent in the after image. The difference image actually reveals some warming close to shore that can perhaps be attributed to relatively warmer river outflow or solar heating. A cooler region exists offshore.

SST before Gloria SST after Gloria SST difference for Gloria

Before
After
Difference (after minus before)


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For scientists more time series Satellite Images in GEOTIFF Format are available

What is Turbidity, Sea Surface Temperature?


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