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The Eighty-sixth regiment, Indiana volunteer infantry. Barnes, James A.  Carnahan, James R. (James Richards), 1840–1905.  McCain, Thomas H. B. 
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GEORGE FREDERICK DICK.

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THE
EIGHTY-SIXTH REGIMENT,
INDIANA
VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.
A NARRATIVE OF ITS SERVICES
IN THE
CIVIL WAR OF 1861 - 1865.

Written by a Committee consisting of

James A. Barnes

,

James R. Carnahan

and

Thomas H. B. McCain

.

CRAWFORDSVILLE, IND.:
THE JOURNAL COMPANY, PRINTERS,
1895.

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TO THE VOLUNTEERS
OF THE
EIGHTY-SIXTH INDIANA REGIMENT,
UPON WHOSE
VALOR, FIDELITY, CONSTANCY AND TRIUMPH,
AROSE
THE STANDARD OF FREE GOVERNMENT AND UNIVERSAL LIBERTY.
AND TO THEIR
SONS AND DAUGHTERS. THEIR WIVES, SISTERS AND MOTHERS,
THIS VOLUME
IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED,
IN THE HOPE
THAT IT MAY REMAIN A TESTIMONIAL TO THEIR HEROIC ENDURANCE
PATRIOTIC SACRIFICES, AND A TRIBUTE TO THEIR
HALLOWED MEMORY.

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CONTENTS.

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INTRODUCTORY.

In the presentation of the history of the Eighty-Sixth Regiment, Indiana Volunteers, the authors seek not their own glorification. The work of writing the part taken by this regiment is undertaken at the request of the members of the regiment who survived the hardships and dangers of the years from 1862-1865 in active campaign life. The desire of these comrades is to preserve for their children, the history of the service they rendered to the Nation in the days of her peril, and that the name and deeds of their regiment may not be entirely forgotten.

It is not intended to write a history of the entire war of the Rebellion, but in narrating the manner by which this regiment was organized, and then formed a part of the great Union Army, or Federal Army as it was called by the people of the South, and then in chronicling the deeds of the men of the Eighty-Sixth, it will be necessary to write to some extent of the opening year of the war, and of the events of the years that followed. We must write somewhat of the organization of the entire Army of the Union, and briefly recount the necessity for the formation of the Eighty-Sixth Regiment, Indiana Volunteers.

After writing of the formation and muster-in of the regiment, it will be necessary to relate something of the general history of the campaigns in which it participated, and the battles in which it bore an important and conspicuous part. The surviving members of this regiment feel a just and honorable pride in the military record of this special body of troops in which they performed their service, and page: 2[View Page 2] they have no less pride in the glorious achievements of every regiment and battery that was mustered into the United States service, and entering the field bore its part in the suppression of the rebellion and the preservation of the American Republic. It is felt that each and all, officers and enlisted men, have "a vested right" in the great glory and renown that so justly belongs to all.

Notwithstanding the fact that the wonderful achievements of the American citizen soldiery merits the highest encomiums from all and for all, yet we as Indiana men will certainly be pardoned if we should in this work, claim for the Indiana soldier, and for those particularly who were active participants in the campaigns and battles of the war through which we passed, as much valor, and as many thoroughly soldierly qualities, included in the terms bravery, courage, daring and prowess, on the battle-field, as can be shown by any other State that took part in that deadly struggle from 1861-1865 inclusive.

On every battle-field during the entire war for the preservation of the Union, Indiana regiments and Indiana batteries were found, and the banners borne by her sons were ever in the thickest and hottest of the fray.

The pages which follow will be simply a recital of the part which the Eighty-Sixth Regiment, Indiana Volunteers, performed in the great drama on the theater of the most bloody war of modern times. It will not be claimed that this regiment did more than any other similar body of men in the field, but the aim is to give a plain, unvarnished story of the marches, the bivouacs, the skirmishes, the battles of this organization, and recount its hardships, its exposures, its privations and its severe trials, —this and nothing more.

JAMES A. BARNES,
JAMES R. CARNAHAN,
THOMAS H. B. MCCAIN.

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