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Indiana Medicine, 1993

Interview List

Interviewee
Ade, Mary Keller March 18, 1993 

Call Number
93-008

Physical Description

39 pages; 3 tapes, 131 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Mary Keller Ade discusses her childhood, education, medical practice, and family in Indiana in this interview. She shares some of her experiences as a physician in both urban and rural locations, and as a physician with a general practice in Lafayette, Indiana where she delivered thousands of babies throughout her career. Dr. Ade discusses her experiences as a female doctor, including discrimination and becoming a role model for other women.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Family Names
    • Ade
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Booher, Olga Bonke
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Welch, Exie
    • Place Names
    • Danville, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Lafayette, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • anesthesia
    • discrimination
    • female physicians
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical internship
    • obstetrics
    • sexism

Interviewee
Albertson, Frank P. October 28, 1993 

Call Number
93-024

Physical Description

53 pages; 3 tapes, 166 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

In this interview, Dr. Frank P. Albertson relates details of his childhood, medical education, and general practice in rural Indiana, as well as many personal anecdotes from his career as a general practitioner. Dr. Albertson discusses the Indiana University School Of Medicine, patients' use of home remedies, changes in medicine, medical breakthroughs, and medical economics. In addition, he speaks of his service in World War II, the effects of the Great Depression on rural medical practice, and doctor-patient confidentiality.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana Academy of General Practitioners
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Link, Goethe
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Trafalgar, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • anesthesia
    • antibiotics
    • farming
    • Great Depression
    • home remedies
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • open chest surgery
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • patient confidentiality
    • penicillin
    • rural medicine
    • stonecutting
    • World War II

Interviewee
Bailey, Lawrence June 15, 1994 

Call Number
93-034

Physical Description

45 pages; 2 tapes, 108 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Lawrence Bailey, born in 1904, recounts his experiences in the field of medicine from his days as a medical student to the final years of his general practice in rural Indiana. He speaks of his medical training, specifically in the area of obstetrics, the medical breakthroughs of antibiotics, the application of anesthesia, and medical developments over the years. Dr. Bailey describes setting up his medical practice during the Great Depression and his medical service during World War II. He emphasizes the decline of doctors' personal care and knowledge of their patients in the past twenty years.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Pittman Moore
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Zionsville, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • chloroform
    • ether
    • Great Depression
    • house calls
    • medical billing
    • medical education
    • patient care
    • obstetrics
    • World War II

Interviewee
Bannon, William G. January 11, 1993 

Call Number
93-001

Physical Description

45 pages; 2 tapes, 103 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. William G. Bannon, born in 1921, speaks of his childhood, his family, and of the fact that he is a second generation doctor. He discusses his medical school experiences, the general types of people who choose specific specializations within the field of medicine, and the Indiana University School Of Medicine. In addition, Dr. Bannon stresses the importance of quality of patient care, dismissing physicians who spend little time on each individual patient. He comments on the changes in medicine, both in medical knowledge and technology, and in medical practice.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Mayo Clinic
    • Phi Psi
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Terre Haute, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • cardiology
    • Great Depression
    • internal medicine
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical insurance

Interviewee
Black, Joseph M. October 9, 1992 

Call Number
92-012

Physical Description

34 pages; 2 tapes, 1 7/8 ips, 72 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Joseph M. Black, born in 1918, speaks of his home, Seymour, Indiana, his childhood, and his entrance into the field of medicine. He discusses Indiana University and its regional campus premedical programs, his own medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine, and his internship. In addition, Dr. Black discusses medical improvements, his general practice in Seymour, his service in the United States Army during World War II, and the increasing costs of malpractice insurance for physicians.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Blue Cross
    • Blue Shield
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • United States Army
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Barker, Claire
    • Carter, Larue D.
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Seymour, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • diversity
    • hitchhiking
    • house calls
    • Indiana University regional campuses
    • malpractice insurance
    • medical changes
    • medical insurance
    • osteomyelitis
    • penicillin
    • World War II

Interviewee
Bonsett, Charles A. May 27, 1992 

Call Number
92-002

Physical Description

39 pages; 3 tapes, 1 7/8 ips, 135 minutes; index

Interviewer
Stowe, Steven

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Charles A. Bonsett, born on March 22, 1921, discusses his family and childhood in Indianapolis, Indiana, the Great Depression, and his education and experiences as an intern through the Indiana University School of Medicine. In this interview, Dr. Bonsett focuses on his main medical interests of neurology and the study and treatment of muscular dystrophy. In addition, he discusses the use and construction of the electromyograph and its usefulness with regard to the study and treatment of epilepsy.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Butler University
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Abrew, Ben
    • Jackson, Leroy
    • Ross, Alexander
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • diversity
    • electromyograph
    • epilepsy
    • Great Depression
    • medical internship
    • medical research
    • multiple sclerosis
    • muscular dystrophy
    • neurology
    • World War II

Interviewee
Booher, Olga Bonke August 18, 1992 

Call Number
92-009

Physical Description

40 pages; 2 tapes, 1 7/8 ips, 106 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Olga Bonke Booher, born on August 14, 1907, recalls her family, childhood, and education in Indianapolis, Indiana, as well as her medical education at Butler University and the Indiana University School of Medicine. She discusses the sexism she experienced as a medical student, her husband, also a physician, and the Great Depression. In addition, she tells some anecdotes from her medical practice and shares her thoughts on modern malpractice insurance.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Butler University
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Plasma Alliance
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Taylor, James H.
    • Place Names
    • Beckley, West Virginia
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • German heritage
    • Great Depression
    • malpractice insurance
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • pediatrics
    • sexism

Interviewee
Bowen, Otis R. May 3, 1994 

Call Number
93-031

Physical Description

33 pages; 2 tapes, 81 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Otis R. Bowen discusses his childhood and family, his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine, and his general practice in Bremen, Indiana. He talks about his military service during World War II, especially in the Allied invasion of Okinawa. In addition, Dr. Bowen comments on his political career, including his term as governor of Indiana, and his appointment to the position of United States Secretary of Health and Human Service by President Ronald Reagan.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • IUPUI
    • South Bend Memorial Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • Indiana governor
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Reagan, Ronald Wilson
    • Ritchey, James O.
    • Place Names
    • Bremen, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • Amish
    • general practice
    • Okinawa invasion
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • political career
    • premedical education
    • student diversity
    • World War II

Interviewee
Bridges, Alvin August 5, 1993 

Call Number
93-020

Physical Description

53 pages; 2 tapes, 85 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Alvin Bridges, an African-American physician born on June 6, 1925, discusses his childhood in the context of the Great Depression, racism, segregation, and his education. He received his medical education at Meharry Medical College, and he discusses his medical internship and later, medical practice in terms of the impact of race relations. In addition, Dr. Bridges speaks of his service in World War II as a Buffalo Soldier, his medical practice in Anderson, Indiana, and the changes in medicine over the past decades.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Duriron Foundry
    • Meharry Medical College
    • University of Dayton
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Anderson, Indiana
    • Dayton, Ohio
    • Subjects
    • genealogy
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • integration
    • medical costs
    • medical technology
    • modern medical schools
    • premedical education
    • racism
    • segregation
    • World War II

Interviewee
Calli, Louis J. June 23, 1994 

Call Number
93-035

Physical Description

54 pages; 2 tapes, 107 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Louis J. Calli, born on August 15, 1910, discusses his talent for baseball and how he was turned from deciding to play professionally to choosing a career in medicine. He speaks of his first-rate medical education at St. Louis University Hospital, the various places he has practiced medicine, and his domestic service in the United States Army during World War II. In addition, Dr. Calli comments on his baseball abilities and experiences, his interest and involvement with horses, the medical changes of the past few decades, and his opinion that the state of medicine in the United States is in a serious state of decline.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Chappy Johnson's All-Stars
    • New York Polyclinic Hospital
    • St. John's University
    • St. Louis University School of Medicine
    • United States Army
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Fort Knox, Kentucky
    • Hazard, Kentucky
    • Massena, New York
    • Subjects
    • baseball
    • general practice
    • horses
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • patient care
    • socialized medicine
    • surgery
    • World War II

Interviewee
Chattin, Herbert October 3, 1994 

Call Number
93-043

Physical Description

56 pages; 3 tapes, 130 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Herbert Chattin, born on April 27, 1914, discusses his childhood, the Influenza Epidemic of 1918, and his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He speaks of his service at various airbases in the United States and Africa during World War II, and his activities in the war period. Dr. Chattin relates stories of his general practice in Vincennes, Indiana, in addition to describing some of the changes in medical practice and medical technology that have occurred in the past century.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • United States Air Force
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Funch, Harold
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Miller, Sam
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Skelton, Red
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Vincennes, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • 1918 Influenza Epidemic
    • adoption
    • female medical students
    • home remedies
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical specializations
    • obstetrics
    • Prohibition
    • World War II

Interviewee
Coffel, Melvin H. June 24, 1994 

Call Number
93-056

Physical Description

35 pages; 2 tapes, 75 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Melvin H. Coffel, born in 1913, discusses his childhood in rural Indiana and his premedical and medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine during the Great Depression. He also speaks of his internship and residency, and his specialization in what used to be called the EENT field: eyes, ears, nose, and throat. His specialty centered on ears, nose, and throat in his practice in Vincennes, Indiana. In addition, Dr. Coffel discusses his years of service in the the United States Navy during World War II.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Subjects
    • allergies
    • medical internship
    • medical residency
    • otolaryngology
    • premedical education
    • surgery
    • World War II

Interviewee
Compton, George June 23, 1994 

Call Number
93-038

Physical Description

45 pages; 3 tapes, 137 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. George Compton, born on June 4, 1915, discusses his family and childhood in Tipton, Indiana, and two of the major health problems he suffered as a child. He speaks of his premedical and medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine, of the outdoor obstetrics medical students practiced as part of their training, and of his internship and residency. After briefly commenting on his service in World War II, Dr. Compton talks about his general practice in Tipton, relating stories of some patients and of the changes and advances in medicine over the years, including the advent and widespread use of penicillin.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Cleveland City Hospital
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Forry, Frank
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Owen, John
    • Place Names
    • Tipton, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • Great Depression
    • home remedies
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical residency
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • penicillin
    • premedical education
    • World War II

Interviewee
Culbertson, Clyde G. April 29, 1992;  July 1, 1992 

Call Number
92-001

Physical Description

77 pages; 5 tapes, 1 7/8 ips, 240 minutes; index; two articles, book excerpt, recollections, autobiographical notes, and list of articles all written by interviewee

Interviewer
Stowe, Steven

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Clyde G. Culbertson, born on July 27, 1906, discusses his childhood, his recollections of the Influenza Epidemic of 1918 and of World War I, and his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He speaks of how he came to specialize in clinical pathology and the role he played in the beginnings of a pathology laboratory at Indiana University. In addition, Dr. Culbertson discusses diseases and their treatment by sulfa drugs, and later, by penicillin, the relationship between Indiana politics and the State Board of Health, and the teaching versus research debate with regard to medicine.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Coleman Hospital
    • Eli Lilly and Company
    • Indiana Board of Health
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis Long Hospital
    • Indianapolis Methodist Hospital
    • Family Names
    • Lilly
    • Occupation Names
    • clinical pathologist
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Forry, Frank
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Harvey, Vern
    • King, William E.
    • McNutt, Paul V.
    • Moon, Virgil
    • Rice, Thurman B.
    • Place Names
    • Vevay, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • 1918 Influenza Epidemic
    • bacteriology
    • clinical pathology
    • gross examinations
    • Indiana politics
    • malaria
    • medical education
    • pathology
    • pathology laboratory
    • penicillin
    • pneumonia
    • polio vaccine
    • sulfa drugs
    • syphilis tests
    • teaching vs. research debate
    • Wassermann test
    • World War I
    • World War II

Interviewee
Dalton, Naomi March 25, 1993 

Call Number
93-006

Physical Description

48 pages; 2 tapes, 115 minutes; index

Interviewer
Stowe, Steven

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Naomi Dalton, born in 1914, discusses her medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine in the early nineteen thirties and the state of medicine in Indiana during this time. She speaks of her experience in general practice and in her specialty, anesthesiology. In addition, she comments on the time spent as a medical missionary in India in the late nineteen fifties. Dr. Dalton also speaks of women in medicine in Indiana from the nineteen thirties to the nineteen sixties.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Debake, Michael
    • Owen, Margaret Telfur
    • Reed, W.C.
    • Schuman, Edith
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Vellore, India
    • Subjects
    • anesthesiology
    • female medical students
    • gross anatomy
    • medical education
    • missionary work
    • open drop ether

Interviewee
Day, William D. July 20, 1993 

Call Number
93-018

Physical Description

39 pages; 2 tapes, 100 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. William D. Day, born in 1902, discusses his youth, medical education, and the setting up of his general practice during the Great Depression. He speaks of his medical internship with the United States Navy, and his service in the South Pacific during World War II. In addition, Dr. Day relates anecdotes from his private practice and discusses the changes medicine had undergone in the sixty years he practiced.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Butler University
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Badertscher, Jacob
    • Emerson, Charles P.
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Okinawa, Japan
    • Seymour, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • Great Depression
    • house calls
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical insurance
    • obstetrics
    • sulfa drugs
    • surgery
    • World War II

Interviewee
Deal, Eleanor June 22, 1993 

Call Number
93-013

Physical Description

20 pages; 1 tape, 45 minutes; index

Interviewer
Stowe, Steven

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Eleanor Deal, born in 1907, discusses her decision to become a doctor, her medical educationat Butler University and the Indiana University School of Medicine, and her experiences in general practice during the Great Depression and World War II. In addition, she comments on her views of women in medicine and doctor-patient relationships.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Speedway, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • medical education

Interviewee
Engel, Edgar, Sr. June 14, 1993 

Call Number
93-012

Physical Description

54 pages; 2 tapes, 110 minutes; index; Ob/Gyn Digest(November 1964), interviewee notes, two articles by interviewee

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Edgar Engel, Sr., born in 1909, discusses his college days and medical education at Washington University School of Medicine. He speaks of his work in obstetrics and gynecology, and the major medical developments in these areas in the past century. Dr. Engel, Sr. focuses on medical practices regarding pre-natal care, births, infertility, sterilization, and caesarean sections. He also speaks of the amazing difference antibiotics have made to medicine.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Deaconess Hospital
    • St. Mary's Medical Center
    • Wabash College
    • Washington University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Evansville, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • abortion
    • antibiotics
    • caesarean sections
    • gynecology
    • home births
    • infertility
    • laser surgery
    • lawsuits
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical insurance
    • obstetrics
    • peritonitis
    • sterilization
    • World War II

Interviewee
Fisch, Charles September 2, 1992 

Call Number
92-010

Physical Description

23 pages; 2 tapes, 67 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Charles Fisch, born on May 11, 1921, discusses his youth in Poland and the United States, and his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He speaks of his specialization in cardiology, the vast strides made in the area of cardiology since World War II, and his role in the development of the Krannert Institute. In addition, he comments on his mentors and what he considers the relatively recent emphasis on physicians' research.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Krannert Institute of Cardiology
    • National Institutes of Health
    • Family Names
    • Krannert
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Hickam, John
    • Schumaker, Harris
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Poland
    • Subjects
    • cardiology
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical research
    • smoke drum
    • World War II

Interviewee
Fitzgerald, Brice E. February 24, 1994 

Call Number
93-027

Physical Description

33 pages; 2 tapes, 85 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Brice E. Fitzgerald, born on December 22, 1913, discusses his youth and early education, attending Indiana University School of Medicine during the Great Depression, and the medical experiences he gained while serving in the United States Air Force during World War II. Dr. Fitzgerald speaks of how he came to specialize in ear, nose, and throat medicine and of how he first began his practice of medicine after the end of World War II. In addition, he comments on medical advances and his opinions about the growing distance in doctor-patient relationships.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Franklin College
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis City Hospital
    • National Guard
    • St. Vincent's Hospital
    • Wright Patterson Airforce Base
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Dayton, Ohio
    • Hammond, Indiana
    • Logansport, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • Great Depression
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • otolaryngology
    • World War II

Interviewee
Green, Frank Harrold July 7, 1992 

Call Number
92-003

Physical Description

44 pages; 2 tapes, 1 7/8 ips, 101 minutes; index

Interviewer
Stowe, Steven

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Frank Harrold Green, born on May 24, 1908, relates his experiences as a member of a family with generations of doctors in its history. He speaks of his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine and some of his work in obstetrics. In addition, Dr. Green discusses the rise of medical insurance, the steep increases in medical fees or prices in the last half of the twentieth century, and the continuing need for family practitioners, rather than a burgeoning force of medical specialists in America.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Family Names
    • Green
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Erdman, John
    • Green, Frank Hayes
    • Green, Jean
    • Green, Lot
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Walther, Joseph E., Sr.
    • Place Names
    • Rushville, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • drugs
    • general practice
    • homeopathy
    • medical changes
    • medical costs
    • medical education
    • medical insurance
    • obstetrics

Interviewee
Green, Morris February 1, 1993 

Call Number
93-003

Physical Description

29 pages; 3 tapes, 130 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1922, the son of Lithuanian immigrants, Dr. Morris Green speaks of his parents, family, childhood, and schooling, and the role each of these played in his decision to become a doctor. He discusses his years as a medical student at the Indiana University School of Medicine, his subsequent experiences at Yale University, his decision to specialize in pediatric medicine, and his return to Indiana University. Dr. Green emphasizes his work at the Riley Hospital and his views about the plight and/or victimization of so many children today, for example, as the result of poverty.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis Riley Hospital
    • Shortridge High School
    • Yale University
    • Occupation Names
    • pediatrician
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Leigh, Perry W.
    • Meiks, Lyman
    • Richmond, Julius
    • Senn, Milton
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Subjects
    • children's health problems
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical specializations
    • pediatrics
    • World War II

Interviewee
Grillo, Donald June 1, 1994 

Call Number
93-032

Physical Description

39 pages; 2 tapes, 98 minutes; index; supplementary report on interviewee's biographical notes by interviewee

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born on January 20, 1905, Dr. Donald Grillo discusses his family background and youth in Gary, Indiana, why he made the decision to pursue a career in medicine, and his premedical and medical training at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He speaks of medical practice during the Great Depression and his service as a doctor during World War II. In addition, Dr. Grillo discusses his specialization in colorectal medicine, the changes that have occurred in medicine during his nearly fifty years of practice, and his thoughts on patient care and the doctor-patient relationship.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Froebel High School
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Emerson, Charles P.
    • Place Names
    • Gary, Indiana
    • South Bend, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • colorectal medicine
    • diversity
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • hemorrhoid treatments
    • home births
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical fraternities
    • patient care
    • World War II

Interviewee
Havens, Russell E. September 9, 1994 

Call Number
93-041

Physical Description

26 pages; 2 tapes, 75 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born on January 26, 1903, Dr. Russell E. Havens discusses his family, which included several doctors, his youth in Cicero, Indiana, and his premedical and medical education at Indiana University School of Medicine. He goes on to comment on his internship at Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis, his interest and later specialization in anesthesiology, and setting up a general practice in Cicero. In addition, Dr. Havens speaks of his medical service in the United States Army during World War II and his change to practicing only anesthesiology after the war.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • United States Army
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Cicero, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • anesthesia
    • anesthesiology
    • general practice
    • medical education
    • medical internship
    • World War II

Interviewee
Hodgin, Phillip October 21, 1993 

Call Number
93-023

Physical Description

65 pages; 2 tapes, 106 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Phillip Hodgin, born on July 29, 1915, discusses his family and childhood, and how he developed an interest in medicine as a career. He speaks of his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine, his internship, and experiences with home births during outdoor obstetrics in medical school. Dr. Hodgin also comments on his medical service in the United States Army during and following World War II. Finally, he relates personal anecdotes about his general practice and his perspective on the changes in medicine over the fifty years he practiced.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Earlham College
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • St. Francis Hospital
    • United States Army
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Hill, Jack
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Japan
    • Orleans, Indiana
    • Paoli, Indiana
    • Richmond, Indiana
    • Youngstown, Ohio
    • Subjects
    • antibiotics
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • home remedies
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • World War II

Interviewee
Horst, William N. December 19, 1994 

Call Number
93-047

Physical Description

37 pages; 3 tapes, 1 7/8 ips, 123 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

William N. Horst, born September 12, 1914 and died September 13, 1997, is a retired doctor living in Crown Point, Indiana at the time of this interview. He talks about his childhood on a bee farm in Crown Point, and his interest in the medical profession. He speaks of his experiences in medical school, the classes he took, and his time interning. He talks about his experiences in World War II, and some of the famous generals he met. He speaks of some of the folk remedies he learned about from his father and grandfather. Finally, he discusses his practice as a family doctor in Crown Point, and the changes in the medical profession over the years.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Cook County Hospital
    • DePauw University
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • St. Vincent's Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Eichelberger, Robert L.
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Tojo, Hideki
    • Wheeler, John
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Crown Point, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • apiaries
    • blood poisoning
    • folk medicine
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical history
    • military doctors
    • polio
    • surgical history
    • World War II

Interviewee
Jones, King Solomon May 9, 1993 

Call Number
93-010

Physical Description

45 pages; 2 tapes, 100 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. King Solomon Jones, born on January 29, 1898, discusses his family and youth in Florida and how he came to choose a career in medicine at Howard University. He speaks of his medical school experiences, his interest and concentration in genital-urinary medicine, and the setting up of his general practice in Michigan City, Indiana. In addition, Dr. Jones comments on the rewards of being a doctor, the discrimination he experienced as an African-American, and the medical changes that have occurred during the span of his career.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Edward Waters College
    • Howard University Medical School
    • King Solomon Jones Medical Foundation
    • St. Anthony Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Graves, Tinola E.
    • Place Names
    • Florida
    • Michigan City, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • anti-Semitism
    • discrimination
    • general practice
    • genital-urinary medicine
    • Great Depression
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • prostitution
    • racism
    • segregation
    • venereal disease

Interviewee
Kilgore, Byron, Jr. March 17, 1994 

Call Number
93-030

Physical Description

49 pages; 3 tapes, 151 minutes; index; excerpts and photographs from interviewee's autobiography

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Byron Kilgore, Jr., born on September 21, 1911, speaks of his youth in Indianapolis, Indiana, the influence his father, a physician, had on his choice of career, and his medical education at Butler University and the Indiana University School of Medicine. He recalls how the Great Depression affected his life and he describes his medical service in the United States Army during World War II, especially on D-Day. In addition, Dr. Kilgore recalls the rapid medical changes after World War II, including the advent of antihistamines and cortisone and later, the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Butler University
    • Central State Hospital
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Menninger's Clinic
    • Phi Chi
    • Shortridge High School
    • United States Army
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • psychiatrist
    • Personal Names
    • Badertscher, Jacob
    • Culbertson, Clyde G.
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Glass, Robert
    • McCormick, C.O., Jr.
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Place Names
    • England
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • 1918 Influenza Epidemic
    • antihistamines
    • cortisone
    • D-Day
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • home remedies
    • malpractice insurance
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • nicotine
    • psychiatry
    • sulfa drugs
    • World War II

Interviewee
Kreitl, Dorothy June 14, 1994 

Call Number
93-039

Physical Description

50 pages; 2 tapes, 102 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Dorothy Kreitl, born on May 29, 1912, discusses her youth and high school education in Massachusetts, and how she decided to become a doctor. She speaks of her premedical and medical education and general practice experiences. In addition, Dr. Kreitl comments on her later work with the Public Health Service and her work in the field of psychiatry. She also briefly discusses the changes that have occurred in medicine during her lifetime.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Boston University
    • Public Health Service
    • University of Michigan Medical School
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Crosby, Elizabeth
    • Place Names
    • Richmond, Indiana
    • Worcester, Massachusetts
    • Subjects
    • contagious diseases
    • female physicians
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • medical education
    • psychiatric drugs
    • psychiatry
    • sexism
    • Thorazine

Interviewee
Lloyd, Frank P. August 10, 1993 

Call Number
93-021

Physical Description

41 pages; 3 tapes, 105 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Frank P. Lloyd, born on October 20, 1919, recalls his family and childhood, and the influence each of these bore on his eventual decision to enter the field of medicine. He discusses his initial education as a chemist, his government service and activities during World War II and the Korean War, his medical education, and his eventual practice in obstetrics, all in the context of racism and segregation. In addition, Dr. Lloyd emphasizes the importance of patient privacy and of politics to the practice of medicine.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Howard University Medical School
    • Indianapolis Methodist Hospital
    • National Bureau of Standards
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Hope, John
    • Rawls, George
    • Place Names
    • Charleston, South Carolina
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • discrimination
    • home births
    • medical education
    • medical politics
    • obstetrics
    • patient confidentiality
    • segregation
    • World War II

Interviewee
Macy, George W. June 8, 1994 

Call Number
93-033

Physical Description

44 pages; 3 tapes, 135 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1905, Dr. George W. Macy discusses his youth and family background in Quincy, Indiana, and describes his medical education and how he came to choose a career in medicine. He speaks of his years and professors at the Indiana University School of Medicine, and of the few years he spent practicing medicine in Peru, South America. Dr. Macy recalls his medical service in the United States Army during World War II and his specialization in surgery. In addition, he discusses his practice in Columbus, Indiana, the significance of the medical changes that have taken place during his career, and his continuing medical education.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis City Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • surgeon
    • Personal Names
    • Hartsaw, John
    • McCain, Morris
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Williams, Mark
    • Place Names
    • Columbus, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Peru
    • Quincy, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • calomel
    • gross anatomy
    • homosexual prejudice
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical technology
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • surgery
    • surgical practice
    • World War II

Interviewee
Manifold, Harold November 16, 1994 

Call Number
93-046

Physical Description

42 pages; 2 tapes, 80 minutes; index; copies of awards, articles regarding interviewee

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Harold Manifold, born on August 27, 1922, recalls his childhood in Madison County, Indiana during the Great Depression and his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine at the onset of World War II. He speaks of his medical service in the United States Army during the war, especially his work with those suffering from venereal diseases. Dr. Manifold discusses his return to civilian medicine in his general practices in Fortville, Indiana and Bloomington, Indiana. Finally, he comments on the changes, which have taken place in medicine since World War II, including the creation of Medicare and Medicaid.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • DePauw University
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • United States Army
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Fortville, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • Army Specialized Training Program
    • continuing education
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • venereal disease
    • World War II

Interviewee
Megenhardt, Dennis September 2, 1992 

Call Number
92-011

Physical Description

46 pages; 3 tapes, 128 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Dennis Megenhardt, born in 1905, discusses his childhood in Spencer, Indiana, how his family lost their wealth in the Great Depression, and two serious childhood illnesses, typhoid and smallpox, that persuaded him to choose a career in medicine. He speaks of his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine and some of his favorite professors. Dr. Megenhardt also discusses his medical service in the United States Army during World War II in England and Italy, with special emphasis on his position as the surgeon of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Winston Churchill. He relates personal anecdotes about each of these men and goes on to comment on his surgical practice in Bloomington, Indiana after returning from the war.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Coleman Hospital
    • Community Hospital
    • Indiana State Normal
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis Methodist Hospital
    • Family Names
    • Bayh
    • Megenhardt
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • surgeon
    • Personal Names
    • Bayh, Birch E.
    • Churchill, Winston
    • Dodge, Horace
    • Eisenhower, Dwight David
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Maulin, Sam
    • Moenkhaus, William J.
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Myers, Charles
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Spencer, Indiana
    • Staunton, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • bile peritonitis
    • gall bladder
    • Great Depression
    • malpractice insurance
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • smallpox
    • surgery
    • teaching
    • typhoid fever
    • World War II

Interviewee
Miller, Laverne B. October 16, 1993 

Call Number
93-022

Physical Description

45 pages; 2 tapes, 84 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Laverne B. Miller, born on November 6, 1915, speaks of his family background and medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine, first in Bloomington, and then in Indianapolis, Indiana. He discusses the setting of his general practice, the changing ratio of general practitioners to specialists since World War II, and describes a typical work day at his practice in the nineteen sixties. Dr. Miller also comments on segregation in the hospitals and the changes that medicine has undergone since World War II.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Deaconess Hospital
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Badertscher, Jacob
    • Miller, M.J.
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Place Names
    • Evansville, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • chiropractors
    • female physicians
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • homeopathy
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical technology
    • osteopathy
    • retirement
    • segregation

Interviewee
Newhouse, Margaret August 3, 1994 

Call Number
93-040

Physical Description

46 pages; 2 tapes, 101 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born on February 26, 1905, Dr. Margaret Newhouse recalls her family background, childhood in Indianapolis, Indiana, and how she decided to become a doctor. She discusses her medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine and setting up her general practice in Morristown, Indiana. Dr. Newhouse also speaks of her practice of medicine in different phases of her life, including general practice, physical therapy, and providing gynecological medical exams at Planned Parenthood. In addition, she speaks of the many changes medicine has undergone in the past fifty years, and of her abiding love of medicine and patient care.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Kappa Delta
    • Planned Parenthood Federation of America
    • St. Vincent's Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Ade, Mary Weber
    • Booher, Olga Bonke
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Ketcham, Jane
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Morristown, Indiana
    • Shelbyville, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • anatomy
    • dissection
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • home births
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • physical therapy

Interviewee
Paris, Durward June 15, 1994 

Call Number
93-037

Physical Description

30 pages; 2 tapes, 93 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Durward Paris, born in 1908, recalls his family and childhood, his premedical education at Butler University, and his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine during the Great Depression. He discusses his medical practice in Kokomo, Indiana, which was general before his medical service in the United States Army during World War II, and changed to an internal medicine practice after the war. In addition, Dr. Paris discusses the changes medicine has undergone since World War II, including the discovery and use of new drugs, the surge in necessary insurance, and the introduction of Medicare and Medicaid.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Billings General Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Scott, William
    • Place Names
    • Kokomo, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • internal medicine
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical insurance
    • nurse training
    • penicillin
    • sulfa drugs
    • World War II
    • x-rays

Interviewee
Paynter, William January 13, 1993 

Call Number
93-002

Physical Description

35 pages; 2 tapes, 109 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad; Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. William Paynter, born on January 31, 1926, recalls his childhood during the Great Depression, his family, which included several doctors, and his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He also speaks of World War II and the GI Bill's contribution to the financing of his medical education. In addition, Dr. Paynter speaks of patient care, his general practice in Pekin, Indiana, and his later specialization in psychiatry and administration of several innovative community mental health centers in Indianapolis, Indiana.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis Wishard Hospital
    • United States Air Force
    • Family Names
    • Paynter
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • psychiatrist
    • Personal Names
    • Sanford, Thomas
    • Place Names
    • Pekin, Indiana
    • Salem, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • 1944 GI Bill
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • medical changes
    • medical costs
    • medical education
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • psychiatry
    • World War II

Interviewee
Ramsey, Frank February 5, 1993 

Call Number
93-004

Physical Description

25 pages; 2 tapes, 63 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1902, Dr. Frank Ramsey recalls his childhood in Bloomington, Indiana, his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine, and the difficulties of setting up a medical practice during the Great Depression. A surgeon trained in Boston's Lahey Clinic, Dr. Ramsey served in the United States Army on the Pacific front during World War II. He also comments on his retirement from the practice of medicine due to the skyrocketing costs of malpractice insurance.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis Long Hospital
    • Lahey Clinic
    • United States Army
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • surgeon
    • Personal Names
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Holland, Frank
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • anesthesia
    • duodenal ulcer
    • Great Depression
    • Indiana State Medical Association Journal
    • malpractice insurance
    • medical education
    • World War II

Interviewee
Rawls, George March 25, 1993 

Call Number
93-005

Physical Description

29 pages; 1 tape, 51 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. George Rawls, a surgeon born on June 2, 1928, recalls his childhood in Florida, his premedical education at Florida A & M, and his medical education at Howard University Medical School. He discusses his medical education, specialization in surgery, and medical practice in the context of the racism and segregation of the times. In addition, Dr. Rawls discusses the two books he has written, the changes that have taken place in medicine, and the importance and necessity of a significant relationship between physician and patient.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Florida A & M University
    • Howard University Medical School
    • Indianapolis Methodist Hospital
    • Philadelphia General Hospital
    • United States Army
    • Occupation Names
    • author
    • physician
    • surgeon
    • Personal Names
    • Drew, Charles
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Washington, DC
    • Subjects
    • History of the Black Physician in Indianapolis
    • Korean War
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • patient care
    • racism
    • segregation
    • surgery
    • The Surgeon's Turn

Interviewee
Reed, Robert F. February 15, 1995 

Call Number
93-050

Physical Description

36 pages; 2 tapes, 1 7/8 ips, 97 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Robert F. Reed, M.D., born in 1921, discusses his early life and education. He recalls medical school courses and professors. He discusses starting out in private practice as a family physician and shares anecdotes about his forty years of practice. Dr. Reed discusses the changes that have occurred in the medical field over the years including the role of the family physician, the move toward specialization, and the progress in technology and treatment, as well as the consequences of these changes. he talks about the things he didn't learn in medical school such as the business aspects and public relations of a medical practice. He also speaks of the satisfaction of being a doctor.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Manchester College
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Mishawaka, Indiana
    • South Bend, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • career satisfaction
    • elderly patients
    • farming
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • house calls
    • malpractice insurance
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical specializations
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • public relations

Interviewee
Richter, Arthur B. July 9, 1992 

Call Number
92-005

Physical Description

35 pages; 3 tapes, 1 7/8 ips, 142 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Arthur B. Richter, born on December 21, 1903, recalls his childhood and later, medical practice in Flora, Indiana. He discusses his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine and training at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Richter comments on the large percentage of doctors who were addicted to morphine, other drugs, and/or alcohol, and on the lack of mental and physical screening for physicians. In addition, he speaks of physician fraud or doctors performing operations they are not qualified to attempt, and the problems with Medicare and Medicaid.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Flora High School
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Peter Breck Brigham Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Calvert, Raymond
    • Emerson, Charles P.
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Osler, William
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Flora, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • 1918 Influenza Epidemic
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • Medicaid
    • medical fraud
    • Medicare
    • physician drug addiction
    • psychiatry
    • World War I

Interviewee
Runge, Paul W. January 18, 1995 

Call Number
93-048

Physical Description

33 pages; 2 tapes, 102 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Paul W. Runge, born on November 6, 1911, recalls his youth in Richmond, Indiana, his premedical education at Wittenberg University and his medical education at the University of Michigan Medical School. After four years of medical service in the United States Army in Panama, Dr. Runge returned to the University of Michigan and eventually began practicing internal medicine in his home town of Richmond. In this interview, he discusses his medical practice, his views on the role of government in health care, the changes that medicine has undergone, and his personal philosophy of medicine.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • University of Michigan Medical School
    • Wittenberg University
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Gugino, Angela
    • Osler, William
    • Reller, Elizabeth
    • Rhoads, Paul S.
    • Warrick, Bewley
    • Place Names
    • Ann Arbor, Michigan
    • Panama
    • Richmond, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • drugs
    • house calls
    • internal medicine
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical insurance
    • medical practice

Interviewee
Rust, Byron K. September 29, 1992 

Call Number
92-008

Physical Description

30 pages; 2 tapes, 1 7/8 ips, 95 minutes; index; curriculum vitae

Interviewer
Stowe, Stephen

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Byron K. Rust, born on April 26, 1904, recalls his youth in Indianapolis, Indiana, his decision to become a doctor, and his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine. A pediatric specialist, he discusses his medical practice in the context of the Great Depression, his role in the development of neonatology, and the many medical changes that came about over the years, including vaccinations and penicillin. In addition, Dr. Rust relates several personal and moving anecdotes from his years of pediatric practice.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis City Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • pediatrician
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Carmichael, Hoagy
    • Cunningham, John
    • Pettijohn, Fred
    • Pyle, Ernie
    • Stephenson, David Curtis
    • Subjects
    • Birth of neonatology
    • Great Depression
    • leukemia
    • lobar pneumonia
    • medical education
    • neonatology
    • pediatrics
    • penicillin
    • private practice
    • sulfa drugs
    • whooping cough
    • Wilms tumor

Interviewee
Sage, Charles V. January 25, 1995 

Call Number
93-049

Physical Description

36 pages; 3 tapes, 1 7/8 ips, 130 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Charles V. Sage, a retired internal medicine doctor in Richmond, Indiana, was born in Brownstown, Indiana on November 2, 1916. He talks about being born with birth defects, and discusses the surgeries he had to endure as a child, which started his life long interest in the medical profession. He discusses his classes and professors at the Indiana University School of Medicine, and the internships he held during his training. He speaks of his experiences in World War II, working in medical wards on the east coast of the United States. He speaks of his decision to move to Richmond, Indiana to raise his family and start a practice. He describes how his family practice has changed over the years, and how the medical profession and medical technology has changed since he first attended medical school.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Lair, J. P.
    • Place Names
    • Brownstown, Indiana
    • Nashville, Tennessee
    • Richmond, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • aplastic anemia
    • birth defects
    • bone marrow transplants
    • diagnosis
    • internal medicine
    • medical costs
    • medical education
    • medical internship
    • medical residency
    • medical technology
    • obstetrics
    • pediatrics
    • penicillin research
    • plastic surgery
    • sulfa drugs
    • tuberculosis hospitals
    • World War II

Interviewee
Schneider, Louis October 3, 1994 

Call Number
93-042

Physical Description

39 pages; 2 tapes, 105 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Louis Schneider, born in 1913, discusses his youth in New York City, his medical education at New York University Medical School, and the continuation of his medical training during his United States Army service in World War II. He describes his pathology practice in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and speaks of the field of pathology, medical advances relevant to pathology, and the satisfactions and dissatisfactions of working in pathology. In addition, Dr. Schneider comments on medical changes in patient care, insurance programs, and the advent of Medicare and Medicaid.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Bellevue Hospital
    • City University of New York
    • New York University
    • St. Joseph's Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • medical examiner
    • pathologist
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Catskill Mountains, New York
    • Fort Wayne, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • blood transfusions
    • blood types
    • elementary education
    • Great Depression
    • laboratory work
    • medical education
    • medical specializations
    • Medicare
    • pathology
    • patient care
    • World War II

Interviewee
Schuman, Edith May 25, 1993 

Call Number
93-011

Physical Description

35 pages; 2 tapes, 83 minutes; index

Interviewer
Stowe, Steven

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Edith Schuman discusses her childhood, family background, and how she decided upon a career in medicine. She speaks of her education and experiences in the Indiana University School of Medicine and her training in internal medicine. Dr. Schuman describes her role in the development of the Indiana University Student Health Center, its importance, and many of the changes that have occurred in medicine over the years, including changes in patient care practices, laboratory work, and the advent of new drugs.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Bassett, Margaret Ann
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Ritchey, James O.
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • antibiotics
    • calomel
    • campus epidemics
    • gentian violet
    • Great Depression
    • internal medicine
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • mononucleosis
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • patient care
    • student health center
    • student soldiers
    • World War II

Interviewee
Scott, I. Winfield November 19, 1993 

Call Number
93-025

Physical Description

35 pages; 2 tapes, 111 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. I. Winfield Scott, born on April 3, 1910, speaks of his family, his experiences suffering from tuberculosis as a teenager, and his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He discusses his pediatric practice, his experiences in the United States Army during World War II, and many of the changes medicine has undergone since World War II. Dr. Scott describes the advent of new drugs, the recession of the popularity of solo private practice, and the near elimination of house calls and childhood bouts of tuberculosis, diphtheria, dysentery, and polio.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis Riley Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • pediatrician
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Place Names
    • Mashhad, Iran
    • Shelbyville, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • bacillary dysentery
    • diphtheria
    • drugs
    • house calls
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • pediatrics
    • polio
    • private practice
    • tuberculosis
    • World War II

Interviewee
Sholty, William M. June 30, 1993 

Call Number
93-014

Physical Description

35 pages; 2 tapes, 73 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1915, Dr. William M. Sholty came from a family of doctors. He speaks of his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine, his early graduation in 1942 and entrance into the United States Army the same year, and his service as a head anesthesiologist in a field hospital in France during World War II. Dr. Sholty relates many personal anecdotes about his medical education, experiences during World War II, his work as a coroner, and his private practice in Lafayette, Indiana. In addition, he discusses some of the changes that have come about in medicine since World War II.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Purdue University
    • United States Army
    • Occupation Names
    • anesthesiologist
    • coroner
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Abasion, John
    • Bowen, Otis R.
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Place Names
    • Lafayette, Indiana
    • Wabash, Indiana
    • Winona Lake, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • anesthesiology
    • football
    • Great Depression
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • Pentothal
    • World War II

Interviewee
Shumacker, Harris April 30, 1993 

Call Number
93-009

Physical Description

54 pages; 3 tapes, 166 minutes; index

Interviewer
Stowe, Steven

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Harris Shumacker, born in 1908, comments on his family's heritage and speaks extensively about his medical education at Johns Hopkins University, surgical training at Yale University, and medical service in Australia during World War II. Dr. Shumacker relates many medical experiences, describes the development of the cardiovascular field, and being hired by Herman B Wells to re-organize the Indiana University School of Medicine. In addition, he emphasizes the necessity of medical research and shares his advice for the improvement of the American medical system.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
    • Yale University
    • Family Names
    • Shumacker
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • surgeon
    • Personal Names
    • Allen, Arthur
    • Battersby, Stan
    • Blalock, Alfred
    • Corwin, Warren
    • Edwards, Lydia
    • Firor, Warfield
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Spencer, Rowena
    • Taylor, Fritz
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Williams, John Whitridge
    • Wintrobe, Max
    • Place Names
    • New England
    • Sydney, Australia
    • Subjects
    • blood transfusions
    • British medical system
    • cardiology
    • female surgeons
    • Indiana University School of Medicine changes
    • medical education
    • medical research
    • medical residency
    • otolaryngology
    • surgery
    • World War II

Interviewee
Teague, Frank December 3, 1993 

Call Number
93-028

Physical Description

32 pages; 2 tapes, 75 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Frank Teague, born in 1904, speaks of his youth and early education, his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine, and his decision to specialize in orthopedic surgery. He discusses his surgical training in New York City, giving special emphasis to his learning of a modern surgical procedure to remove ruptured discs. Dr. Teague recalls his early years of private practice, his daily routine, and he shares his thoughts on patient care.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Boy Scouts
    • Butler University
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Family Names
    • Forsythe
    • Occupation Names
    • orthopedic surgeon
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • Great Depression
    • medical education
    • orthopedics
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • private practice
    • ruptured discs
    • surgery

Interviewee
Thatcher, Hugh K. March 10, 1994 

Call Number
93-029

Physical Description

40 pages; 2 tapes, 100 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Hugh K. Thatcher, born on May 16, 1910, recalls his youth in Indianapolis, Indiana, and his college and medical education at Butler University and the Indiana University School of Medicine. He speaks of his experiences in the service during World War II and how this absence affected his private practice in Indianapolis. In addition, Dr. Thatcher discusses his extensive involvement in various medical associations and the many changes that have occurred during his fifty years of medical practice.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Butler University
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Booher, Norman
    • Booher, Olga Bonke
    • Bowen, Otis R.
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Moenkhaus, William J.
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Rice, Thurman B.
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • antibiotics
    • blood transfusions
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical paperwork
    • medical specializations
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • syphilis treatment
    • World War II

Interviewee
Thomas, Edward Paul April 23, 1993 

Call Number
93-007

Physical Description

41 pages; 3 tapes, 97 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Edward P. Thomas, an African-American physician born on July 26, 1920, speaks of his family, his upbringing in a racist and segregated America, and his medical education at Butler University and Meharry Medical School. He comments on his service as a physician in the United States Army and the United States Navy during and after World War II, the friends he made at college and in the service, and the discrimination he experienced. In addition, Dr. Thomas discusses his general practice in Indianapolis, Indiana, his interest in the treatment of allergies, some of the changes medicine has undergone since World War II, and his beliefs about patient care.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Butler University
    • Indianapolis Methodist Hospital
    • Meharry Medical College
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Jones, Jim
    • Rawls, George
    • Turner, Edward L.
    • Place Names
    • Great Lakes Naval Base, Illinois
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • career satisfaction
    • general practice
    • home births
    • lawsuits
    • Medicaid
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • racism
    • segregation
    • World War II

Interviewee
Tower, T. Kermit July 27, 1993 

Call Number
93-019

Physical Description

38 pages; 2 tapes, 109 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. T. Kermit Tower, born on September 15, 1908, describes growing up in rural Crawford County, Indiana, his college and medical education at DePauw University and the Indiana University School of Medicine, and his general family practice in Campbellsburg, Indiana. He comments on some of the medical changes of the past fifty years with regard to patient care, malpractice suits, technological and drug advances, and the advent of Medicaid. Dr. Tower also shares many personal memories and anecdotes of his years practicing medicine in rural Indiana.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • DePauw University
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis Long Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Place Names
    • Campbellsburg, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • cardiology
    • general practice
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • patient care
    • Medicaid

Interviewee
Vagner, S. Bernard July 7, 1993 

Call Number
93-017

Physical Description

39 pages; 2 tapes, 118 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. S. Bernard Vagner, an African-American surgeon born on October 28, 1917, recalls his childhood in Louisiana, his medical education at Meharry Medical College, and setting up his general practice in South Bend, Indiana, all of which occurred in a context of racism and segregation. He discusses his military experiences of deferment during World War II, while the United States Army was still segregated, and his active duty in Germany during the Korean War in an integrated unit. In addition, Dr. Vagner comments on his general practice, his surgical specialization, and changes in medical practice and technology that have occurred over the years.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Homer G. Phillips Hospital
    • Hubbard Hospital
    • Meharry Medical College
    • United States Army
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • surgeon
    • Personal Names
    • Hale, John
    • Paytash, Peter
    • Rolfe, Daniel T.
    • Place Names
    • Shreveport, Louisiana
    • South Bend, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • career satisfaction
    • general practice
    • gross anatomy
    • home births
    • integration
    • Korean War
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical internship
    • military discrimination
    • obstetrics
    • racism
    • segregation
    • surgery
    • World War II

Interviewee
Van Buskirk, Edmund L. June 30, 1993 

Call Number
93-015

Physical Description

33 pages; 2 tapes, 90 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Edmund L. Van Buskirk, born on October 15, 1907, recalls his childhood in Fort Wayne, Indiana, the influence of having doctors in his family, and his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He speaks of his early desire for and choice of ophthalmology as his specialization. Dr. Van Buskirk describes some encounters with professors, experiences with fellow medical students and doctors, and some stories from his professional practice involving the use of medical advances, especially in retinal surgeries.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Albion College
    • Arnett Clinic
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • ophthalmologist
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Culbertson, Clyde G.
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Megenhardt, Dennis
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Ranke, Henry
    • Ruschle, Edward
    • Stier, Paul
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Fort Wayne, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • Great Depression
    • gross anatomy
    • medical education
    • ophthalmology
    • outdoor obstetrics
    • patient care
    • retinal surgery

Interviewee
Vollrath, Victor November 9, 1994 

Call Number
93-045

Physical Description

32 pages; 2 tapes, 100 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Victor Vollrath, born on July 23, 1916, recalls his youth in Irvington, a suburb of Indianapolis, Indiana, his decision to become a physician, and his medical education at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He speaks of his memories of professors and classes at medical school, especially his anatomy classes. In addition, Dr. Vollrath discusses his early years of general practice in California, his Indianapolis general practice, his entrance into aerospace medicine, and the immense satisfaction he has gained from a career of helping people. He cites the third party in medicine, including insurance companies and Medicare, as causes of the modern decline in the quality of patient care.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Arsenal Technical High School
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis Wishard Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Halbrook, Harold
    • Holland, J.P.
    • Kelly, Walter
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Irvington, Indiana
    • Los Angeles, California
    • Subjects
    • aerospace medicine
    • career satisfaction
    • general practice
    • gross anatomy
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical insurance
    • medical specializations
    • patient care
    • surgery

Interviewee
Walters, Charles E. November 2, 1994 

Call Number
93-044

Physical Description

51 pages; 2 tapes, 108 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Charles E. Walters, born on November 10, 1913, discusses his childhood in Mishawaka, Indiana, the Great Depression, and decision to become a physician. He recalls his medical education, particularly his study of pathology, at the Indiana University School of Medicine. A surgeon by specialization, Dr. Walters describes his experiences in military service in the South Pacific during World War II. After the war, he returned to Mishawaka to set up a private surgical practice. Dr. Walters comments on the many medical advances that have come about in his more than forty years of practice, and emphasizes the importance of patient care and a good bedside manner.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Battle Creek College
    • Dodge Manufacturing Company
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • surgeon
    • Personal Names
    • Forry, Frank
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Harger, Rollo
    • Owen, John
    • Place Names
    • Mishawaka, Indiana
    • South Bend, Indiana
    • South Pacific
    • Subjects
    • anesthesia
    • autopsies
    • Great Depression
    • gross anatomy
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • pathology
    • patient care
    • polio
    • surgery
    • terminal illness
    • World War II

Interviewee
Walther, Joseph E. July 10, 1992 

Call Number
92-004

Physical Description

51 pages; 3 tapes, 1 7/8 ips, 162 minutes; index

Interviewer
Berry, Chad

Keywords

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Joseph E. Walther, born on November 24, 1912, discusses his family and childhood, his father, who was a doctor, and his premedical and medical education at DePauw University and the Indiana University School of Medicine. He speaks of working his way through college during the Great Depression, and participating in track in the 1932 Olympics. Dr. Walther speaks extensively of his service as a flight surgeon in the United States Air Force during World War II, including experiences in Pearl Harbor, Midway Island, Guadalcanal, and Iwo Jima. In addition, he discusses his practice of medicine in Hawaii and Indiana, medical changes throughout the twentieth century, the importance of patient care, and his role in the creation of a clinic, a hospital, and a medical foundation in Indianapolis, Indiana.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Blue Cross
    • DePauw University
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Indianapolis Memorial Clinic
    • Indianapolis Methodist Hospital
    • Mary Margaret Program
    • United States Air Force
    • Wilcox Memorial Hospital
    • Winona Memorial Hospital
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Badertscher, Jacob
    • Einhorne, Larry
    • Green, Frank Hayes
    • McHale, Frank
    • Walther, Joseph E., Sr.
    • Walther, Mary Margaret
    • Place Names
    • Guadalcanal
    • Hickam Field, Hawaii
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Iwo Jima
    • Kauai, Hawaii
    • Midway Island
    • Rushville, Indiana
    • South Pacific
    • Subjects
    • 1932 Olympics
    • aspirin
    • Atabrine
    • cancer
    • digitalis
    • Great Depression
    • malaria
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • patient care
    • Pearl Harbor
    • purging
    • sulfa drugs
    • World War II

Interviewee
Williams, Alexander Samuel July 6, 1993 

Call Number
93-016

Physical Description

56 pages; 3 tapes, 167 minutes; index

Interviewer
Ettinger, Patrick

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Dr. Alexander Samuel Williams, born on March 26, 1922, recalls his childhood and family in Alabama, his early experiences with the Ku Klux Klan there, the impact of the Great Depression, and his decision to pursue a career in medicine. He speaks of his medical education at Meharry Medical College, the professors who influenced him, and the setting up of his general practice in Gary, Indiana. Dr. Williams discusses the satisfaction he has derived from practicing medicine and describes his struggle for the desegregation of hospitals in Gary. In addition, he comments on medical changes and developments in medical technology, and on changes in the public's perception of physicians over the years.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Fisk University
    • Gary College
    • Gary Methodist Hospital
    • Homer G. Phillips Hospital
    • Ku Klux Klan
    • Meharry Medical College
    • St. Mary's Hospital
    • University of Chicago
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Carver, George Washington
    • Turner, D.W.
    • Walker, Matthew J.
    • Yokem, Paul
    • Place Names
    • Gary, Indiana
    • Huntsville, Alabama
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • discrimination
    • drug addiction
    • general practice
    • Great Depression
    • immunization
    • integration
    • medical changes
    • medical education
    • medical technology
    • obstetrics
    • penicillin
    • racism
    • segregation
    • spinal taps
    • World War II