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History of Indiana University, 1968-1981

A Guide to the Collection of Oral History Interviews at Indiana University Bloomington

Finding aid prepared by the staff of the Center for the Study of History and Memory with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities Division of Preservation and Access, 2000-2002

Overview of the Collection

Repository
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
Indiana University
400 North Sunrise Drive
Weatherly Hall North, Room 122
Bloomington, IN 47405
Phone: 812/855-2856
Fax: 812/855-0002
E-mail: ohrc@indiana.edu
http://www.indiana.edu/~cshm

Creator
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory

Title
History of Indiana University, 1968-1981

Project No.
ohrc053

Interviews
90 interviews. Audiotapes, transcripts, and collateral materials.

Physical Location
Interviews are housed in Weatherly Hall North, Room 122. Copies are also housed at the Indiana University Archives in Herman B Wells Library E460. For other locations housing the interviews from this project, please contact the Center for the Study of History and Memory office.

Language
Materials are in English

Abstract
This project is a compilation of interviews of subjects with strong ties to and memories of Indiana University, primarily at the Bloomington campus. The interviewees include former students, faculty, and staff, among others. The information contained in the interviews generally spans a little more than the first half of the twentieth century and often deals with the administrations under presidents William Lowe Bryan and Herman B Wells. The project is a survey of Indiana University's history as a whole including information about various academic departments, athletics, student organizations, campus growth, university development, living conditions, segregation and the treatment of African-Americans, the administration, and the importance of jazz at Indiana University. In addition, the impact of specific events, such as the Great Depression, World War I, World War II, the Vietnam War, and water shortages, is detailed in many of the interviews in this project.

Scope and Content Note

This collection contains ninety interviews conducted over the course of thirteen years. The interviews range from approximately 20 to 240 minutes. All interviews consist of audio reels and most have typed transcripts and collateral materials.

Administrative Information

Acquisition Information
Oral history interviews conducted by the Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory from 1968 to the present, with particular focus on the history of twentieth-century America and the Midwest.
Usage Restrictions
The archive of the Center for the Study of History and Memory at Indiana University is open to the use of researchers. Copies of transcript pages are available only when such copies are permitted by the deed of gift signed by the interviewee. Scholars must honor any restrictions the interviewee placed on the use of the interview. Since some of our earlier (pre-computer) transcripts do not exist in final form, any editing marks in a transcript (deletions, additions, corrections) are to be quoted as marked. Tapes may not be copied for patrons unless the deed of gift permits it, and a transcript is unavailable for that interview. The same rules of use that apply to a transcript apply to the taped interview. Interviews may not be reproduced in full for any public use, but excerpted quotes may be used as long as researchers fully cite the data in their research, including accession number, interview date, interviewee's and interviewer's name, and page(s).
Preferred Citation
[interviewee first name last name] interview, by [interviewer first name last name], [interview date(s)], [call number], [project name], Center for the Study of History and Memory, Indiana University, Bloomington, [page number(s) or tape number and side if no transcript].
Interview List

Interviewee
Allen, Frank Emerson June 7, 1969 

Call Number
69-016

Physical Description

22 pages; 1 reel, 3 1/4 ips, 60 minutes; index

Interviewer
Cuffel, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1891, Frank Emerson Allen, athletic director from 1955 to 1961 and former trustee at Indiana University, discusses the development and changes undergone at the university in the post-World War II era. An Indiana University alumnus and former athlete, Allen talks of the university's sports programs and recruitment efforts both as they existed under his management and at the time of the interview. Allen also touches upon the financial development of Indiana University, the milestone retirement of President William Lowe Bryan, and the introduction of a retirement plan for the university's faculty. The interview concludes with Allen's opinion and response to conflicts, demands, and needs of the student body at that time.

  • Keywords
    • Occupation Names
    • athletic director
    • trustee
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • McNutt, Ruth J.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Subjects
    • 1944 GI Bill
    • athletic recruiting
    • retirement

Interviewee
Allen, Howard "Wad" January 18, 1973 

Call Number
73-003

Physical Description

46 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 110 minutes; index, photograph of interviewee, resumé

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Allen discusses some of the changes that the jazz age brought to the Indiana University campus and also talks about some of his professors and fellow students.

Howard "Wad" Allen, born 1902 and a native of southern Indiana, attended Indiana University from 1920 to 1920 to 1926.1926. The Indiana University students experienced a lot of social changes at this time with the return of soldiers from World War I, the enactment of Prohibition, and the beginnings of the jazz age. Allen was very active in campus life. He wrote for Vagabond and the Indiana Daily Student, was varsity yell leader, and a member of the Delta Upsilon fraternity. Allen was also a member of Hoagy Carmichael's band, Carmichael's Collegians," in which he played saxophone and violin. After graduating from Indiana University, Allen was a reporter and a columnist for the Anderson Herald, He eventually settled in New York City and worked for Johns Manville as Director of Public Relations and Vice President of Sales.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Arbutus
    • Army ROTC
    • Book Nook
    • Carmichael's Collegians
    • Delta Upsilon
    • DePauw University
    • Indiana Daily Student
    • Indiana University
    • Johns Mansville Corporation
    • Ku Klux Klan
    • Princess Theater
    • Sigma Delta Chi
    • University of Michigan
    • Vagabond
    • Washington High School
    • Occupation Names
    • journalist
    • musician
    • Personal Names
    • Beiderbecke, Bix
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Carmichael, Hoagy
    • Costas, Peter
    • Hastings, John S.
    • Herold, Don
    • Moenkhaus, William J.
    • Nichols, "Red"
    • Pyle, Ernie
    • Tonner, Ed
    • Wells, Agnes E.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Anderson, Indiana
    • Chicago, Illinois
    • Martinsville, Indiana
    • New Orleans, Louisiana
    • Paris, France
    • Southern Indiana
    • Terre Haute, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • alcohol
    • automobiles
    • Baptist church
    • dances
    • fiddle
    • Jazz Age
    • jazz music
    • Prohibition
    • saxophone
    • World War I

Interviewee
Allen, Ross September 21, 1970 

Call Number
70-008

Physical Description

49 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 120 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Ross Allen was a member of the Department of Music's faculty beginning in 1953. He initially discusses the growing popularity of classical music in the United States and then moves on to explain the growth of Indiana University's Department of Music. He mentions the concept of the stage consecrating festival play. Mr. Allen is primarily interested in opera. He focuses on how the music department won fame and respect for their ability to perform the Wagner opera, Parsifal, annually and also, the times when the Metropolitan Opera came to perform at Indiana University.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University
    • Indiana University School of Music
    • Metropolitan Opera
    • Occupation Names
    • instrumentalist
    • music director
    • professor
    • singer
    • Personal Names
    • Bain, Wilfred C.
    • Bing, Rudolph
    • Hoffman, Ernst
    • Leger, Francine
    • Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus
    • Wagner, Richard
    • Weil, Kurt
    • Wells, Herman B.
    • Place Names
    • Cincinnati, Ohio
    • Germany
    • Linz, Austria
    • Salzburg, Austria
    • Subjects
    • Broadway
    • chamber work
    • German language
    • high school bands
    • music education
    • musical community
    • musical theater
    • opera
    • Parsifal
    • prima donnas
    • radio
    • television
    • World War II

Interviewee
Anderson, Hanson; Barnhart, Dean L. June 8, 1969 

Call Number
69-010

Physical Description

41 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 160 minutes; index; photograph of Dean Barnhart, newspaper clippings about Hanson Anderson

Interviewer
Cuffel, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Hanson Anderson and Dean Barnhart both attended Indiana University from 1907-1911. They discuss the changes that have occurred on campus over the past sixty years. During Anderson and Barnhart's day, Indiana University had only 1,800 students, African-Americans were not permitted to participate in varsity sports, and a date cost only twenty cents. At the time of their interview, the campus has swelled to 28,000 students and there is widespread discontent about the quality of teaching and the role of Teaching Assistants. Mr. Barnhart discusses his life. After leaving Indiana University, he first found work as a reporter and later, worked for the Department of Health in drug and alcohol education. Mr. Anderson became an educator and the school principal of Arsenal Technical High School.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Arsenal Technical High School
    • Delta Tau Delta
    • Indiana Daily Student
    • Indiana Men's Union
    • Indiana University
    • Public Service Commission
    • Occupation Names
    • editor
    • journalist
    • school principal
    • teacher
    • Personal Names
    • Aley, Robert J.
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Johnson, Fred Bates
    • Lardner, Ring
    • Miller, Robert A.
    • Sheldon, James
    • Snyder, John W.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Woodburn, James A.
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Madison County, Indiana
    • Vincennes, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • alcohol
    • alcoholism
    • boarding houses
    • drug education
    • educational quality
    • journalism
    • mathematics
    • segregation
    • smoking
    • student population
    • swimming pools
    • water supply

Interviewee
Arlt, Gustave O. August 17, 1980 

Call Number
81-002

Physical Description

11 pages; 1 tape, 1 7/8 ips, 30 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Monologue at request of Henry H. H. Remak

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Gustave O. Arlt, a member of the German Department at Indiana University from 1923 to 1925 and from 1931 to 1935, relates the events occurring after World War I that led to the beginning of his career in Bloomington. Arlt tells anecdotes about his co-workers, the community and society of Bloomington in the early twentieth century, and the development of Indiana University in this same time period.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University Department of German
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Voss, Bert John
    • Wooley, Elmer Otto
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • community life
    • World War I

Interviewee
Baker, David N. July 30, 1980 

Call Number
80-047

Physical Description

31 pages; 1 reel, 1 7/8 ips, 60 minutes; no index

Interviews are housed in Weatherly Hall North, Room 122. Copies are also housed at the Indiana University Archives in Herman B Wells Library E460. For other locations housing the interviews from this project, please contact the Center for the Study of History and Memory office.

Interviewer
Kirkendall, Andrew J.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1931, David N. Baker is a renowned African-American jazz musician, innovator, composer, teacher, and author who recounts his jazz-influenced youth in Indianapolis, his career as a musician, and his arrival as a student at Indiana University in 1950 in this interview. This was the beginning of a relationship that would last decades and have a meaningful impact on the Indiana University School of Music. Baker began teaching in the School of Music in 1966, and soon thereafter created one of the first jazz degree programs in the country. His interview reveals many of the influences in his life and music, including his fellow musicians, experiences of racism and segregation, and society in that time period.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • George Russell Sextet
    • Indiana University School of Music
    • Occupation Names
    • composer
    • jazz musician
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Coker, Jerry
    • Hampton, Locksley Wellington
    • Hubbard, Freddie
    • Jones, Virgil
    • Pennick, Bill
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • African-American Studies
    • bebop
    • jazz music
    • jazz studies
    • music
    • racism
    • segregation
    • writing

Interviewee
Banta, Frank September 19, 1980 

Call Number
81-003

Physical Description

10 pages; 1 tape, 1 7/8 ips, 35 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Remak, Henry H. H.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Frank Banta, a student of the Indiana University German Department and alumnus of Indiana University, relates his memories and experiences of the department in the late nineteen thirties and early nineteen forties. Banta discusses specific professors, the strengths of their classes, and anecdotes of the personal relationships he shared with some professors. Included are especially poignant sequences describing some effects of World War I and the Holocaust on one professor Banta was close to.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Department of German
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Leser, Hedwig Gruen
    • Zucker, Adolph
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Germany
    • Subjects
    • Holocaust
    • World War II

Interviewee
Barnhart, Dean L.; Gill, George E. 1970 

Call Number
70-003

Physical Description

52 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 120 minutes; black & white photo of interviewee

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.; Harshman, Kemp; Kosarko, Joseph

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Indiana University alumni Dean L. Barnhart, born in 1889, and George E. Gill, who graduated in 1911 and 1912 respectively, discuss their time at the University in the first and second decades of the twentieth century. Central to the interview is their contribution to and participation in the origination of the Indiana University Memorial Union in 1909. They relate their experiences as students at Indiana University in such areas as Greek life, women's clubs, and campus activities; also described is the general environment in Bloomington in that time period, which was reflective of contemporary national issues including Prohibition and typhoid epidemics. Through the course of their studies at Indiana University and their lives afterwards, both men maintained friendly relations with many of the most prominent names in the University's history, such as William Lowe Bryan and Ernest H. Lindley.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Acacia
    • Arbutus
    • Delta Tau Delta
    • Indiana Daily Student
    • Indiana University Memorial Union
    • Women's League
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Lindley, Ernest Hiram
    • Smith, U.H.
    • Sollitt, Ralph
    • Whittenberger, John M.
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • college traditions
    • dances
    • diversity
    • fraternities
    • Prohibition
    • sororities
    • typhoid

Interviewee
Barnhart, Hugh June 13, 1971 

Call Number
71-019

Physical Description

35 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 85 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Peterson, D. Scott

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Hugh Barnhart, an alumnus of Indiana University who graduated in 1915, tells of his college experiences, including university costs, Greek life, travel by rail, diversity issues, the coming of World War I, athletics, and various university activities and traditions that took place in the second decade of the twentieth century. Barnhart also discusses his personal knowledge, and in some cases, acquaintance with some United States presidents, including Theodore Roosevelt, William Taft, and Woodrow Wilson, achieved through his father's position as a congressman. Also detailed in Barnhart's posting as conservation commissioner of the state of Indiana from 1941 to 1945, and a discussion of the issue of conservation as it existed in the World War II and post-World War II eras.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Delta Tau Delta
    • Indiana State Conservation Department
    • Purdue University
    • Occupation Names
    • commissioner
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Roosevelt, Theodore
    • Taft, William Howard
    • Wilson, Thomas Woodrow
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Rochester, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • 1898 Spanish-American War
    • basketball
    • college traditions
    • conservation
    • diversity
    • dress code
    • fraternities
    • railroads
    • sororities
    • World War I

Interviewee
Blough, Earl May 11, 1971 

Call Number
71-011

Physical Description

75 pages; 3 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 180 minutes; no index; copy of obituary, biographical sketch

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Earl Blough was born in 1876 in LaGrange County, Indiana and received early education there. In his interview he reflects on his education in a largely Amish community. He was an Indiana University student from 1895 to 1899, majoring in chemistry, and receiving an A.B. He recalls student life and many of his professors there. He taught science at LaGrange (Indiana) High School from 1899 to 1900 and physics and chemistry at Iron Mountain (Michigan) High School from 1900 to 1902. He worked briefly in 1902 as a chemist with Oliver Mining Company in Iron Mountain. From 1902 to 1903, Blough studied engineering at Cornell University. In 1905, he started work at Pittsburgh Reduction Company (later called Aluminum Company of America and Alcoa). In 1928, Blough became vice president and director of Aluminum Limited in Montréal, Québec, Canada. He recalls the building of the Shipshaw hydroelectric power plant on the Saguenay River in Québec. Blough died in 1971.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Alcoa, Incorporated
    • Cornell University
    • Oliver Mining Company
    • Pittsburgh Reduction Company
    • Occupation Names
    • associate instructor
    • high school teacher
    • metallurgist
    • Personal Names
    • Acres, Harry G.
    • Alexander, Clyde Lauder
    • Alexander, William A. "Red"
    • Bancroft, Wilder D.
    • Crone, Frank L.
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Hall, Charles M.
    • Jordan, David Starr
    • Lauder, Mae
    • Lyons, Robert E.
    • Mellon, Andrew
    • Stephenson, Harry Thew
    • Swain, Joseph
    • Woodburn, James A.
    • Place Names
    • Iron Mountain, Michigan
    • Lagrange, Indiana
    • New Kensington, Pennsylvania
    • Niagara Falls
    • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    • Saguenay River, Québec
    • Subjects
    • aluminum
    • classical music
    • iron industry
    • metallurgy
    • mining

Interviewee
Bluhm, Maurice L. June 8, 1969 

Call Number
69-011

Physical Description

38 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 90 minutes; index

Interviewer
Cuffel, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Maurice L. Bluhm graduated from Indiana University in 1913. After majoring in history, he went on to become a history teacher, a attorney, vice president for the Milwaukee Railroad, a judge, and then a prosecutor. From 1950 to 1955, he served on the Indiana University Athletics Commission. Bluhm discusses two of his more notable classmates, Wendall Wilkie, Bluhm's roommate, and Paul V. McNutt, who both went on to have successful political careers. He goes on to provide more general information about life at Indiana University at that time, including water problems, transportation, the quality of education, and living conditions.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • University of Chicago
    • Indiana University
    • United States Naval Academy
    • Milwaukee Railroad
    • Commonwealth and Southern Corporation
    • Phi Delta Phi
    • Bryan's house
    • Family Names
    • McGuffey
    • Occupation Names
    • judge
    • high school history teacher
    • attorney
    • prosecutor
    • politician
    • Personal Names
    • Truman, Harry S.
    • Gill, Thomas
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Bryan, Charlotte Lowe
    • Atwater, Amzi
    • Johnston, Harold W.
    • Hepburn, Charles McGuffey
    • Hogate, Enoch George
    • Willkie, Wendell L.
    • McNutt, Paul V.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Minton, Sherman
    • Roosevelt, Franklin Delano
    • Place Names
    • Akron, Ohio
    • Annapolis, Maryland
    • Chicago, Illinois
    • Kendallville, Indiana
    • Monticello, Indiana
    • Winnetka, Illinois
    • Subjects
    • Cornfield Conference
    • cost of living
    • dating
    • discrimination
    • fraternities
    • law school
    • politics
    • school activities
    • sororities
    • transportation
    • water supply
    • World War I

Interviewee
Bradfield, Joseph L. March 27, 1969 

Call Number
69-003

Physical Description

9 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 20 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Joseph Bradfield attended Purdue University from 1903 to 1905 and from 1907 to 1909. He discusses the huge Indiana/Purdue rivalry that existed at that time, and especially, a train wreck that occurred in 1903 when Purdue students were traveling to Indianapolis to watch a football game with their rivals, eighteen Purdue students were killed in the crash.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University
    • Purdue University
    • Westinghouse
    • Personal Names
    • Ade, George
    • Stoner, Richard B.
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Licking County, Ohio
    • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    • Subjects
    • train wrecks
    • university rivalry

Interviewee
Buehrig, Edward H. April 19, 1973 

Call Number
73-008

Physical Description

21 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 55 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Edward H. Buehrig, born on October 4, 1910, began teaching at Indiana University in 1934 in the early years of the Department of Political Science. He continued teaching throughout three university presidencies, namely, those of William Lowe Bryan, Herman B Wells, and Elvis J. Stahr; this experience gave Buehrig many insights into the growth and expansion of Indiana University in the middle of the twentieth century. Also discussed are various important personalities in the history of Indiana University, including Peter Fraenkel and Fernandus Payne.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University
    • Indiana University Department of Political Science
    • Occupation Names
    • political science professor
    • Personal Names
    • Briscoe, Herman T. "Kay"
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Fraenkel, Peter
    • Hall, Ford P.
    • Payne, Fernandus
    • Stahr, Elvis J.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Subjects
    • libraries
    • university growth

Interviewee
Burton, Narcissus N. 1978 

Call Number
78-048

Physical Description

6 pages; 1 reel, 1 7/8 ips, 15 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

In 1926, Mrs. Narcissus N. Burton came to study at Indiana University. As a female African-American student, she was in the vast minority of the student population and, as such, gained first hand experience with segregation and discrimination, as was typical of the time period. Despite these not inconsiderable setbacks, Mrs. Burton received her degree in home economics in 1930 and has many positive comments about her professors at Indiana University.

  • Keywords
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • discrimination
    • segregation

Interviewee
Butcher, Joseph O. June 16, 1969 

Call Number
69-019

Physical Description

28 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 60 minutes; no index; photo of interviewee, news article

Interviewer
Cuffel, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Joseph O. Butcher, retired Marine Corps general and Indiana University alumnus, recounts his experiences at the university as a student and as an interested and active alumnus. Butcher discusses Bloomington society, the effects of the Great Depression, diversity and the African-American presence at Indiana University in the nineteen thirties, his role in the Korean War, and views on communism. Tied to his remarks on these subjects are Butcher's comments and opinions of the student protests at the university in the nineteen sixties and the importance of specific areas in students' education.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Industrial College of the Armed Forces
    • United States Marine Corps
    • Occupation Names
    • marine corps general
    • Personal Names
    • Davis, Benjamin
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Panmunjom, Korea
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • communism
    • community life
    • diversity
    • Great Depression
    • Korean War
    • student protests

Interviewee
Byrnes, Robert F. December 20, 1968 

Call Number
68-010

Physical Description

41 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 100 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Robert Byrnes was a history professor at Indiana University from 1956 through at least the time of this interview. During that time, he also served as chairman of the department. This interview primarily focuses on the changes that have occurred in Indiana's history department from the nineteen forties through the nineteen sixties. According to Byrnes, the department was weak during the nineteen forties and nineteen fifties due to a poor quality of students, bad attitudes, lack of leadership, and inter-departmental conflicts. When Burnes took over as chair he resolved to improve things and he did. He made the department more international, placing a greater emphasis on studies of eastern Europe, Russia, and South America. Burnes was helped by the support of Chancellor Herman Wells. The interview concludes with Burnes' thoughts on students of the present day.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Ford Foundation
    • Indiana University
    • Indiana University Department of English
    • Indiana Univeristy Department of Government
    • Indiana University Department of History
    • Students for a Democratic Society
    • Occupation Names
    • history professor
    • Personal Names
    • Ashton, John W.
    • Briscoe, Herman T. "Kay"
    • Grimm, Harold
    • Gucker, Frank G.
    • Murray, John J.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Subjects
    • academic incompetence
    • department rivalry
    • Eastern European studies
    • inbreeding
    • inferiority complex

Interviewee
Byrum, Arlo E. June, 1970 

Call Number
70-020

Physical Description

28 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 70 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Arlo Byrum attended Indiana University from 1915 to 1920, with the exception of the 16 months in which he served during World War I. Once on campus, he opened a clothes pressing business, which proved very lucrative since all of the male students wore suits at that time. Byrum comments on the social life at the university. As president of the sophomore class and a member of the basketball team, he was a well-known student. He says that the most important thing he learned at Indiana University was how to deal with people. While at the university, Byrum also became involved with the local YMCA. This led him on to his future career; he became a secretary and executive for the YMCA, which allowed him to travel all over the country.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Phi Psi
    • Valparaiso University
    • YMCA
    • Occupation Names
    • basketball player
    • dry cleaner
    • tennis player
    • YMCA president
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Bumbright, Carl
    • Lindley, Ernest H.
    • Logan, Harlan
    • Stiehm, Ewald Ortwin "Jumbo"
    • Stout, Selatie Edgar
    • Place Names
    • Anderson, Indiana
    • Santa Monica, California
    • Torch Lake, Michigan
    • Subjects
    • basketball
    • campus life
    • class size
    • clothing
    • economics
    • fundraising
    • Greek system
    • travel
    • World War I

Interviewee
Chamness, Ivy Leone January 24, 1969 

Call Number
68-012

Physical Description

19 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 45 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Ivy Leone Chamness attended Indiana University from 1902 to 1906. After working as a teacher and for a publishing company for eight years, she returned to Indiana University to work as an editor and publisher on several university publications. She remained at Indiana University until her retirement. Chamness mentions several aspects of campus life including the look of the campus, room and board, a water shortage, train travel, and a smallpox outbreak.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Alumni Quarterly
    • Bobbs-Merrill
    • Monthly
    • Family Names
    • Showers
    • Weir
    • Occupation Names
    • editor
    • publisher
    • teacher
    • Personal Names
    • Breed, Mary Bidwell
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Kinsey, Alfred C.
    • Maxwell, Julia
    • Sampson, Martin Wright
    • Place Names
    • Hagerstown, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • campus life
    • clothing
    • medical school
    • room and board
    • smallpox
    • smoking
    • train travel
    • university fees
    • water shortages

Interviewee
Clevenger, Zora G. June 16, 1969 

Call Number
69-020

Physical Description

30 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 70 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Cuffell, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Zora G. Clevenger, an Indiana University alumnus from the class of 1904 and the Athletic Director from 1923 to 1946, tells of his memories of Bloomington, the Indiana University campus, and athletics at the beginning of the twentieth century. Clevenger discusses the changes in the game of football that occurred in the first half of the century and describes Greek life, female students, and the life-style and living conditions of Indiana University students in that time period. He also comments on his knowledge of and friendship with three of the university's presidents, Joseph Swain, William Lowe Bryan, and Herman B Wells. Throughout the interview, Clevenger traces the history of the Indiana University Athletics Department.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Athletic Department
    • Purdue University
    • Occupation Names
    • athletic director
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Dean, Everett
    • McCracken, Branch
    • Rothrock, David A.
    • Swain, Joseph
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Muncie, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • athletic funding
    • baseball
    • boarding houses
    • campus life
    • early twentieth century athletics
    • female students
    • football
    • fraternities
    • railroads
    • sororities
    • World War II

Interviewee
Clevenger, Zora G. November 25, 1969 

Call Number
69-041

Physical Description

12 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 30 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Zora G. Clevenger, an Indiana University alumnus from the class of 1904 and the Athletic Director from 1923 to 1946, tells of his memories of the university campus, athletics, and fellow football players in the first decade of the twentieth century. He also discusses former Indiana University president Joseph Swain and his experiences as the Athletic Director, including the hiring of Alvin N. "Bo" McMillin.

  • Keywords
    • Occupation Names
    • athletic director
    • Personal Names
    • Chandler, "Happy"
    • McMillin, Alvin N. "Bo"
    • Pihos, Pete
    • Sparks, William
    • Swain, Joseph
    • Subjects
    • baseball
    • campus life
    • football

Interviewee
Davidson, Frank January 16, 1969 

Call Number
68-011

Physical Description

41 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 100 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Frank Davidson, Indiana University alumnus from the class of 1913 and long-time professor in the university's English Department, discusses his years as a student and the life and times in Bloomington in the early twentieth century. Davidson relates memories and anecdotes of favorite professors and the university presidents he had the opportunity to work with. Also covered in the interview are Davidson's experiences as a soldier in World War I, his thoughts on Indiana's public school system at the beginning of the twentieth century, and the changes it has since undergone.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Department of English
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Hendricks, Cecilia Barbara Hennel
    • Hershey, Amos S.
    • Howe, William David
    • Leonard, Bob
    • Leser, Eugene
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Woodburn, James A.
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • advertising
    • boarding houses
    • epidemics
    • football
    • public schools
    • World War I

Interviewee
Dean, Everett S. June 9, 1969 

Call Number
69-012

Physical Description

25 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 60 minutes; index

Interviewer
Cuffel, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Everett S. Dean came to Indiana University in 1917. He received his degree in economics, was vice-president of the senior class, and played basketball and baseball for Indiana University. He was also a member of the SATC, or the Student Army Training Corps. After graduation, Dean went on to coach baseball and basketball at Indiana University, Stanford University, and Carleton College. He concludes his interview by discussing present-day student dissent at the university along with the interviewers.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Alpha Tau Omega
    • Carleton College
    • Stanford University
    • Student Army Training Corps
    • Occupation Names
    • baseball coach
    • basketball coach
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Hay, John
    • Jordan, David Starr
    • Morrison, Sarah Parke
    • Sembower, Charles J.
    • Snyder, John W.
    • Struck, Raymond "Dutch"
    • Place Names
    • Salem, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • basketball
    • dissent
    • Great Depression
    • Indiana University alumni
    • religion
    • teaching assistants

Interviewee
Dunn, Oscar June 7, 1970 

Interviewee
70-019

Physical Description

22 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 50 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Oscar L. Dunn was born in Sandborn, Indiana, on 21 June 1914. He describes his days as a student at Indiana University from 1932 to 1936, during the Great Depression. Dunn also describes his work at General Electric, fundraising for Indiana University, the Indiana University Foundation, and alumni relations. He also reflects on student uprisings of the late nineteen sixties and early nineteen seventies.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • General Electric Company
    • Personal Names
    • Armstrong, William S.
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Lusk, Harold
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Vincennes, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • fundraising
    • Great Depression
    • Indiana University alumni relations
    • student life
    • student protests

Interviewee
Edwards, Edward E.; Wells, Herman B August 5, 1974 

Call Number
74-011

Physical Description

34 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 80 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.; Collins, Dorothy

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Edward Edwards was a professor at Indiana University and Herman Wells was its chancellor. In this interview, they discuss the positive changes that Wells made to the University. The discussion is mainly centered around the financial matters of the University.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Public Works Administration
    • Purdue University
    • WPA
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • university chancellor
    • Personal Names
    • Bartley, E. Ross
    • Kinsey, Alfred C.
    • McKinley, Richard
    • Shrader, Edward Albert
    • Wells, Agnes E.
    • Subjects
    • clergy
    • football
    • Indiana Institutions Acts
    • insurance
    • National Banking Act
    • New Deal
    • physical plant
    • regulatory commissions
    • salaries
    • university finances

Interviewee
Elliott, Byron K. June 9, 1970 

Call Number
70-012

Physical Description

40 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 95 minutes; no index; black and white photo, transcription of entry from 1970-71 edition of Who's Who in America

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Restricted

Scope and Content Note

Byron K. Elliott was born in Indianapolis on May 5, 1899. He attended Shortridge High School there before going to Bloomington, where he attended Indiana University from 1917 to 1920. Elliott describes student life and life in a fraternity and reflects on the friendliness of Midwesterners. Elliott also describes being elected to the Indiana Superior Court in 1926. In 1929, he became general counsel of the American Life Convention. His involvement in the John Hancock life insurance company began when he became general solicitor in 1934. He became president of the company in 1957 and chairman of the board in 1963. He talks about his involvement with Indiana University as an alumnus and as national chairman of the university's 150th Birthday fundraising efforts.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • alumni association
    • American Life Convention
    • Indiana Daily Student
    • Indiana Superior Court
    • John Hancock Financial Services, Incorporated
    • Ku Klux Klan
    • Shortridge High School
    • Family Names
    • DeHority
    • Rawles
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Buley, Roscoe Carlyle
    • DeHority, Edward H.
    • Hale, Will Taliaffero
    • Rawles, William A.
    • Young, Grace
    • Watson, James E.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Subjects
    • economics
    • fraternity life
    • fundraising
    • Midwestern hospitality
    • oral history
    • student life
    • student protests
    • World War I

Interviewee
Ewing, Oscar R. June 7, 1970 

Call Number
70-011

Physical Description

34 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 80 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Oscar R. Ewing, an Indiana University alumnus from the class of 1910, became a successful attorney and presidential appointee to the position of federal security administrator from 1947 through 1953. In this interview, he discusses his experiences, professors, and life as a student at Indiana University in the first decade of the twentieth century. Ewing also relates memories and stories of Greek life on campus, as well as his transition to Harvard Law School, and service in World War I. The interview concludes with Ewing commenting on his association with Judge Charles Evans Hughes and Harry Truman, among others, in the course of his long and distinguished career.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Beta Theta Pi
    • Choate Club
    • Harvard Law School
    • Occupation Names
    • attorney
    • federal security administrator
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Harding, Samuel Bannister
    • Hughes, Charles Evans, Jr.
    • Hughes, Charles Evans, Sr.
    • Lindley, Ernest H.
    • Roosevelt, Theodore
    • Taft, Robert A., Sr.
    • Truman, Harry S.
    • Subjects
    • campus life
    • fraternities
    • World War I

Interviewee
Fox, Jane February 15, 1979 

Call Number
79-013

Physical Description

34 pages; 1 reel, 1 7/8 ips, 75 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Giroux, Vincent A., Jr.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Jane Fox, a professor in the Indiana University Department of Physical Education for Women from 1927 through 1965, specialized in teaching dance. In this interview, she tells of her experiences in the early twentieth century which led to her career as a dance teacher. She details the movements of natural dance and modern dance, describing the associated costumes, important role models and mentors, and the general purpose of each. Ms. Fox discusses the impact of World War II on Indiana University dance classes and the changes dance at the university has undergone through the decades.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Columbia University
    • Indiana University Department of Physical Education for Women
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Duncan, Isadore
    • Holm, Hanya
    • Place Names
    • Bennington, Vermont
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • modern dance
    • Natural Dance Movement
    • World War II

Interviewee
Fraenkel, Peter July 30, 1970 

Call Number
70-013

Physical Description

53 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 135 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Peter Fraenkel was a German-born trilingual teenager living in Bolivia when he first encountered Indiana University president, Herman B Wells, the man who would exert one of the central influences on his life. Fraenkel and Wells quickly established an excellent rapport resulting in a young Fraenkel traveling with Wells to West Germany on a federal education redevelopment project, enrolling as a student at Indiana University in the late nineteen forties, and later becoming one of Wells' most trusted aides. In this interview, Fraenkel discusses his relationship with Wells, Wells' beliefs, the growth of the university under Wells' leadership, and the administrators and faculty who served under him, including Joseph Franklin and Herman T. "Kay" Briscoe, among many others.

  • Keywords
    • Occupation Names
    • assistant to president
    • Personal Names
    • Bartley, E. Ross
    • Biddle, Ward G.
    • Briscoe, Herman T. "Kay"
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Collins, Ralph L.
    • Franklin, Joseph A.
    • Herring, Hubert
    • Rich, Claude T.
    • Visher, Stephen Sargent
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Wright, Wendell W. "Whack"
    • Place Names
    • Berlin, Germany
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Bolivia
    • Subjects
    • Indiana University administration
    • Kinsey reports
    • post World War II period
    • public education
    • university growth
    • World War II

Interviewee
Franklin, Joseph A. September 29, 1969 

Call Number
69-029

Physical Description

18 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 45 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Joseph Franklin attended Indiana University as a student beginning in 1922. Forty-nine years later, he was still a Hoosier, serving as Fiscal Counsel to the President. He spent the years in between as a member of the university administration in various positions including vice-president and treasurer of Indiana University. Franklin briefly discusses some problems that have plagued the university over the years like operating a university during the Great Depression, the chronic water shortage, and the "pest house" where sick students were sent. He spends the rest of the interview talking about important administrators, like William Lowe Bryan and Herman B Wells, and some of his favorite professors.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University
    • School of Business
    • Occupation Names
    • vice president of financial affairs
    • Personal Names
    • Briscoe, Herman T. "Kay"
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Esarey, Logan
    • McNutt, Ruth J.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Williams, Kenneth P.
    • Woodburn, James A.
    • Subjects
    • Great Depression
    • higher education funding
    • nepotism
    • pest house
    • university finances
    • water shortages

Interviewee
Franklin, Joseph A. July 18, 1974 

Call Number
74-012

Physical Description

28 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 60 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Warriner, David

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Joseph Franklin attended Indiana University as a student beginning in 1922. Forty-nine years later, he was still a Hoosier, serving as Fiscal Counsel to the President. He spent the years in between as a member of the university administration in various position including vice-president and treasurer of Indiana University. In this interview, he primarily discusses the financial affairs of the university, including the impact of World War II veterans and the GI Bill.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University
    • WPA
    • Occupation Names
    • accounts comptroller
    • auditor
    • treasurer
    • Personal Names
    • Biddle, Ward G.
    • Harles, Cecil E.
    • Harper, Fowler V.
    • Nelson, Alice M.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Subjects
    • 1944 GI Bill
    • grocery co-op
    • highway
    • international students
    • married students
    • nursing
    • off-campus housing
    • university fees
    • university finances
    • veterans' housing
    • veterans' wives
    • World War II

Interviewee
Garrett, William L. June 5, 1970 

Call Number
70-016

Physical Description

24 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 60 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open (oral Deed of Gift)

Scope and Content Note

William Garrett attended Indiana University from 1947 to 1951, majoring in business and physical education. He was the first African-American athlete in the Big Ten to be offered a basketball scholarship. Garrett discusses what it was like to be a minority on campus and on the basketball them in the late nineteen forties and expresses frustration with the lack of career placement services offered to African- Americans. He compares this to the treatment of minorities on campus in 1970 and speculates on what can be done to improve their situation. After leaving Indiana University, Garrett was recruited by the Boston Celtics but did not have a chance to play with them due to his service in the Korean War. Upon returning to the United States., Garrett played for the Harlem Globetrotters for a few years. He eventually settled in Indianapolis, working as a business and physical education teacher.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • alumni association
    • Boston Celtics
    • Crispus Attucks High School
    • Harlem Globetrotters
    • Indianapolis Olympians
    • Kappa Alpha Psi
    • YMCA
    • Occupation Names
    • army special services
    • athletic director
    • basketball coach
    • basketball player
    • teacher
    • Personal Names
    • Capehart, Homer Earl, Jr.
    • McCracken, Branch
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Indianapolis, Indiana
    • Japan
    • Shelbyville, Indiana
    • Toledo, Ohio
    • Subjects
    • 1944 GI Bill
    • African-Americans
    • basketball
    • career placements
    • discrimination
    • Greek system
    • Korean War
    • minority groups
    • scholarships
    • segregation

Interviewee
Good, Kenneth J. June 7, 1970 

Call Number
71-003

Physical Description

24 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 60 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Kenneth Good attended Indiana University from 1916 to 1920. He majored in history and was very active in the History Club. Good also worked as a stenographer on campus, typing letters and manuscripts for professors. During his college years, Good took a break from school to help train World War I recruits at Drake University. In addition, Good provides more details on his life at Indiana University, including social life, lectures, and studying. After graduation, Good had two careers, one in banking and the other as an escrow businessman in California.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Army ROTC
    • Drake University
    • Harvard Law School
    • Indiana University
    • Indiana University History Club
    • National Guard
    • Phi Beta Kappa
    • Student Army Training Corps
    • Occupation Names
    • bookkeeper
    • cashier
    • legal assistant
    • recruit trainer
    • secretary
    • stenographer
    • Personal Names
    • Dean, Everett
    • Elkin, William B.
    • Hale, George C.
    • Woodburn, James A.
    • Place Names
    • Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana
    • Knox, Indiana
    • Los Angeles, California
    • Subjects
    • 1898 Spanish-American War
    • lectures
    • social life
    • study habits
    • studying
    • World War I

Interviewee
Harrell, Charles E. July 16, 1974 

Call Number
74-013

Physical Description

58 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 100 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Warriner, David

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1911, Charles E. Harrell was an Indiana University student who received his undergraduate degree in philosophy in 1933 and his law degree in 1936. Harrell later eschewed a career in law for employment at Indiana University, first as assistant to the assistant registrar. Through the years, Harrell became registrar, dean of admissions, and finally, the secretary of the Indiana University board of trustees. in this interview, he discusses the university's post-World War II growth, the effects of the GI Bill and veterans enrolling at the university, Greek life, and the creation of dormitories and apartments for married students.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Purdue University
    • Tuttle Handbook
    • Sigma Chi
    • Occupation Names
    • director of admissions
    • registrar
    • Personal Names
    • Briscoe, Herman T. "Kay"
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Wright, Wendell W. "Whack"
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • 1944 GI Bill
    • dormitories
    • fraternities
    • married students
    • sororities
    • university growth
    • veterans
    • World War II

Interviewee
Hastings, John S. November 19, 1970 

Call Number
70-014

Physical Description

79 pages; 4 reels, 3 3/4 ips,190 minutes; no index; 2 photos of interviewee

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.; Collins, Dorothy

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1898, John S. Hastings attended Indiana University beginning in 1916, served in World War I, and returned to the university to finally earn his law degree between 1921 and 1923. Though never a professor of law, Hastings rose through the ranks to become a chief judge of the seventh court of appeals in Chicago, while maintaining extensive contact with his Alma mater, Indiana University. This contact occurred in the form of Hastings' membership to and later, role as presiding officer of, the Indiana University board of trustees from 1936 through 1959. In this interview, Hastings discusses his personal relationships and memories of such notable university figures as William Lowe Bryan, Herman B Wells, and George A. Ball, and more specifically, he describes the transition between the Bryan and Wells administrations.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • board of trustees
    • Indiana State Legislature
    • Indiana University Foundation
    • International Cultural Administration
    • Occupation Names
    • judge
    • Personal Names
    • Ball, George A.
    • Bartley, E. Ross
    • Biddle, Ward G.
    • Bryan, Charlotte Lowe
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Emerson, Charles P.
    • Fesler, James W.
    • Gatch, Willis D.
    • Herron, James P.
    • La Follette, J.J.M.
    • Stahr, Elvis J.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • honorary degrees
    • Kinsey reports
    • West German redevelopment
    • World War I
    • World War II

Interviewee
Hill, Patton J. June 6, 1969 

Call Number
69-015

Physical Description

26 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 60 minutes; index

Interviewer
Cuffel, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Patton J. Hill was born in Evansville, Indiana, and graduated from Indiana University with an A.B. in economics in 1920. He returned to Indiana University to earn an A.M. in education in 1934. In his interview, he describes what it was like to be an African-American in Bloomington and Indiana University. He describes his early jobs and his work as a junior high school principal in Trenton, New Jersey, at the time of its desegregation.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Moore Rubber Company
    • Occupation Names
    • junior high school principal
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Robley, Mary G.
    • Stahr, Elvis J.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Trenton, New Jersey
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • distinguished alumni
    • Great Depression
    • racial discrimination
    • school desegregation
    • student life

Interviewee
Hynenam, Charles; Carter, Byrum December 5, 1978 

Call Number
79-002

Physical Description

39 pages; 1 reel, 1 7/8 ips, 75 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Ostrom, Elinor

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Hyneman and Byrum Carter speak about Indiana University during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies, especially the changing role of African-American students, student protests, and the Vietnam War. They then move onto more theoretical topics, including academic freedom and tolerance within the university environment.

Charles Hyneman attended Indiana University as an undergraduate and returned to Bloomington in 1956 as a political science professor.

  • Keywords
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • university chancellor
    • Personal Names
    • Gruniger, Pauline
    • Pozzatti, Rudy
    • Place Names
    • Cambodia
    • Subjects
    • academic research
    • African-American students
    • English classes
    • graduate students
    • McCarthyism
    • sociology
    • student protests

Interviewee
Jasper, Paul G. June 12, 1971 

Call Number
71-015

Physical Description

31 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 70 minutes; index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Peterson, D. Scott

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1908, Paul G. Jasper entered Indiana University as an undergraduate student in 1927 and completed his degree in law by 1932. His successful career included work as a attorney, a supreme court judge for the state of Indiana, and later, special counsel for and vice president of Public Service Company, Indiana. In this interview, Jasper discusses various aspects of Indiana University throughout the decades, including student life and activities, student housing, attendance policy, and many others. In addition, Jasper comments on politics of the state of Indiana; he emphasizes such issues as pollution, pollution legislation, and the patronage system.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University Board of Aeons
    • Occupation Names
    • attorney
    • Indiana supreme court judge
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • McCracken, Branch
    • Ryan, John W.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • coal
    • diversity
    • football
    • Great Depression
    • housing
    • Indiana politics
    • Indiana state government
    • Indiana University attendance policy
    • patronage
    • pollution
    • pollution legislation
    • student life
    • university growth
    • World War II

Interviewee
Johnson, George A. June 7, 1969 

Call Number
69-014

Physical Description

26 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 60 minutes; index

Interviewer
Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Restricted

Scope and Content Note

George A. Johnson, a native of Bloomington, Indiana, was a student at Indiana University from 1911 to 1915. He describes his time as a student and his experiences as an African-American. He also describes his experiences as a history teacher and school administrator in Vincennes, Indiana, Fort Smith, Arkansas, Wilmington, Delaware, and Cheyney, Pennsylvania.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Correctional Institution of Delaware
    • NAACP
    • Occupation Names
    • high school administrator
    • teacher
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Harris, Archie
    • Hill, Patton J.
    • Johnson, Fred Bates
    • Johnson, George L.
    • Owens, Jesse
    • Stahr, Elvis J.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Woodburn, James A.
    • Place Names
    • Wilmington, Delaware
    • Subjects
    • African-American soldiers
    • African-Americans
    • distinguished alumni
    • racial discrimination
    • World War II

Interviewee
Jordan, Harold W. May 2, 1973 

Call Number
72-008

Physical Description

34 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 80 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

A large part of Jordan's interview is spent discussing the evolution of the social and cultural life on campus, especially how it improved with the construction of the Indiana University Memorial Union and the Indiana University Auditorium. He concludes by speaking about notable performances at the university, including those of the Metropolitan Opera.

Harold W. Jordan came to Indiana University in 1928 and graduated in 1932 with a degree in business. Jordan maintained close ties with the school, serving as manager of the Indiana University Bookstore, Director of Indiana University. Service Enterprises, and Director of the Indiana Memorial Union. Jordan discusses several influential university administrators, including William Lowe Bryan, Ward G. Biddle, and Herman B. Wells.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Eggers and Higgens
    • Hoosier Art Salon Patrons Association
    • Indiana Memorial Union
    • Indiana University
    • Indiana University Auditorium
    • Indiana University Student Union board
    • Metropolitan Opera
    • Family Names
    • Showalter
    • Occupation Names
    • actor
    • artist
    • bookstore manager
    • governor
    • Indiana University administrator
    • instrumentalist
    • singer
    • Personal Names
    • Beecham, Thomas
    • Benton, Thomas Hart
    • Biddle, Ward G.
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Cornell, Katherine
    • McNutt, Paul V.
    • Nelson, Alice M.
    • Steele, T.C.
    • Sutherland, Joan
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Subjects
    • After Opera Antics
    • artists
    • dormitories
    • fine arts
    • Hall of Murals
    • social life

Interviewee
Juergens, George October 12, 1978 

Call Number
78-054

Physical Description

27 pages; 1 reel, 1 7/8 ips, 60 minutes

Interviewer
Goggins, John H.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

George Juergens, born in 1932, has been a professor in the Indiana University Department of History since 1967. In this interview, he discusses his experiences at Indiana University in the nineteen sixties. Juergens' memories of student activism, race relations, protests, and strikes at Indiana University parallel the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War. Events such as the Dow Incident, the Ballantine Hall Lock-In, the 1969 tuition increase, and the reactions of the student population to each event are detailed. Juergens also comments on the beginning of Black Studies course offerings at Indiana University, racism, and the Black Movement in general.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Columbia University
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Dillencourt, Jane
    • Johnson, Bob
    • Rubin, Jerry
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • 1969 tuition increase
    • African-American Studies
    • Ballantine Lock-In
    • Black Power Movement
    • Civil Rights Movement
    • racism
    • Vietnam War

Interviewee
Kidd, Robert L. June 9, 1969 

Call Number
69-017

Physical Description

9 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 25 minutes; no index; small photograph

Interviewer
Cuffel, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Robert L. Kidd came from Brazil, Indiana, to attend Indiana University from 1919 to 1923. He majored in geology and used his education in family businesses in the coal industry and with Cities Service Oil Company. Kidd was chair of major gifts for the 150th anniversary fundraising efforts of Indiana University. He died in 1972.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Army ROTC
    • Cities Service Oil Company
    • Occupation Names
    • geologist
    • Personal Names
    • Cummings, Edgar Roscoe
    • Kidd, Linn S.
    • Logan, William N.
    • Reeves, John R.
    • Subjects
    • fundraising
    • geology
    • student life

Interviewee
Kinsey, Clara M. February 17, 1969 

Call Number
68-013

Physical Description

26 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 60 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Clara M. Kinsey began as a student at Indiana University in 1917 majoring in chemistry. While on campus, she met and married Alfred C. Kinsey. Mrs. Kinsey discusses life in Bloomington in the nineteen twenties. She spends about half of the interview talking about her husband's career; focusing on his studies and collections of gall wasps and then, how he became interested in studying human sexual behavior and the reactions to his studies in this area.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University
    • Indiana University Department of Botany
    • Indiana University Department of Zoology
    • Sigma Xi
    • Women's Athletic Association
    • Occupation Names
    • entomologist
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Kinsey, Alfred C.
    • Mottier, David Myers
    • Scott, William
    • Subjects
    • gall wasps
    • human sexuality
    • student life
    • World War I

Interviewee
Kohlmeier, Albert L., Mrs. November 11, 1968 

Call Number
68-006

Physical Description

27 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 65 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Restricted (no deed of gift)

Scope and Content Note

The wife of Indiana University professor Albert L. Kohlmeier describes social life in Bloomington during the administration of President William Lowe Bryan.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University Department of History
    • Indiana University School of Music
    • Family Names
    • Eigenmann
    • Woodburn
    • Occupation Names
    • faculty wife
    • history professor
    • Personal Names
    • Bain, Wilfred C.
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Channing, Edward
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Harding, Samuel Bannister
    • Hershey, Amos S.
    • Kohlmeier, Albert L.
    • Woodburn, James A.
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • Great Depression
    • train travel
    • university faculty

Interviewee
Konopinski, Emil J. February 20, 1973 

Call Number
73-004

Physical Description

31 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 75 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1911, Emil J. Konopinski came to Indiana University in 1938 as a professor of physics. In this interview, he tells of his experiences in nuclear physics. These experiences focus on World War II, the use of the atomic bomb, and his contributions to the creation of this weapon. Konopinski comments on fellow physicists, including Albert Einstein and fellow Indiana University professor, Alan Mitchell, and their respective roles in World War II nuclear tests, experiments, and warfare.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University Department of Physics
    • Occupation Names
    • nuclear physicist
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Compton, Arthur
    • Curtis, Lila
    • Einstein, Albert
    • Fermi, Enrico
    • Hitler, Adolf
    • Langer, Lawrence M.
    • Mitchell, Alan
    • Roosevelt, Franklin Delano
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Chicago, Illinois
    • Germany
    • Hiroshima, Japan
    • Los Alamos, New Mexico
    • Nagasaki, Japan
    • Subjects
    • atomic bomb
    • nuclear physics
    • World War II

Interviewee
Kuntz, Edward J. July 18, 1974 

Call Number
74-014

Physical Description

57 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 75 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Warriner, David

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1921, Edward J. Kuntz is an Indiana University alumnus for both his undergraduate and graduate degrees, earned in 1942 and 1948, respectively. After serving in World War II, Kuntz returned to Bloomington to begin his career at Indiana University. He became a faculty member in 1948, teaching business courses, and serving as assistant dean, dean, and director of various academic areas over the course of his career. Kuntz recalls student life at Indiana University before and after World War II, putting emphasis on veterans, their experiences at the university, and how they made an impact on Indiana University.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Army ROTC
    • School of Business
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • university administrator
    • Personal Names
    • Bodine, Richard
    • Leser, Hedwig Gruen
    • Rich, Claude T.
    • Shoemaker, Raymond L.
    • Stahr, Elvis J.
    • Weimar, Arthur M.
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • American Civil War
    • housing
    • Indiana business
    • student life
    • transportation
    • university growth
    • veterans
    • World War II

Interviewee
Link, Goethe January 23, 1970 

Call Number
70-001

Physical Description

42 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 100 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Harshman, Kemp; Owen, Kent Christopher; Perry, Chris

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1879, Goethe Link was an Indiana University alumnus and renowned physician. In this interview, he tells of his years as a student at Indiana University, from 1894 to 1896, and his involvement with the fraternity, Phi Kappa Psi. A widely respected physician, Link helped in the organization of the first medical department at Indiana University, located in Indianapolis, in addition to performing many innovative medical procedures, including the first medically performed drainage of the pancreas in the world. This interview chronicles Link's involvement in Greek life and campus activities while he was a student at the university, as well as his lengthy medical career.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Medicine
    • Phi Delta Theta
    • Phi Kappa Psi
    • Wabash College
    • Family Names
    • Showers
    • Occupation Names
    • physician
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Fisher, Carl
    • Mumford, Bish
    • Myers, Burton Dorr
    • Olivwylie, Grace
    • Rice, Thurman B.
    • Van Buskirk, Carl George
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • fraternities
    • German language
    • student life

Interviewee
Lundin, C. Leonard October 10, 1972 

Call Number
72-014

Physical Description

38 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 90 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Charles Leonard Lundin was a professor of history at Indiana University. He was born in 1907 in Montréal, Québec, Canada, and was raised in New England. He describes the provincialism of Bloomington in the late nineteen thirties and early nineteen forties, Herman B Wells' presidency at Indiana University, the impact of World War II on Indiana University, race relations, history faculty, the Indiana University Auditorium, and student protests during the Vietnam War. Lundin died in Bloomington in 1998.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • American Veterans Committee
    • FBI
    • First Presbyterian Church
    • Indiana University Auditorium
    • NAACP
    • Shortridge High School
    • Occupation Names
    • barber
    • history professor
    • Personal Names
    • Andressohn, John C.
    • Anguizola, Gus
    • Barnhart, John D.
    • Benns, Frank Lee
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Buley, Roscoe Carlyle
    • Douglas, Paul H.
    • Esarey, Logan
    • Kohlmeier, Albert L.
    • Lynch, William Orlando
    • Morgan, William T.
    • Mueller, Kate
    • Rachmaninoff, Sergei
    • Rusk, Dean
    • Stahr, Elvis J.
    • Taylor, Maxwell
    • Townsend, Prescott
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Wright, Frank Lloyd
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Nigeria
    • Subjects
    • barber shops
    • communism
    • desegregation
    • Hall of Murals
    • race relations
    • racial discrimination
    • Spanish Civil War
    • Vietnam War protests
    • World War II
    • World War II veterans

Interviewee
MacClintock, Lander December 10, 1968; December 11, 1968; December 17, 1968 

Call Number
68-008

Physical Description

57 pages; 3 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 135 minutes; index

Interviewer
Winther, Oscar O.; Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Lander MacClintock, born in 1889, was a professor in the Department of French and Italian at Indiana University. He recalls his parents, education, and career as a member of the Indiana University. faculty. In particular, he reflects on the operations of the Department of Romance Languages, later called the Department of French and Italian, after the formation of the Spanish Department. He recalls the administrations of presidents William Lowe Bryan and Herman B Wells, cultural life, and the construction of buildings on campus. MacClintock died in 1980.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University Department of French and Italian
    • Indiana University Department of Romance Languages Vagabond
    • Indiana University Department of Spanish
    • University of Chicago
    • Family Names
    • MacClintock
    • Maxwell
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, Charlotte Lowe
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Buley, Roscoe Carlyle
    • Dewey, John
    • Hershey, Amos S.
    • Hill, Elijah C.
    • Hill, John
    • Kohlmeier, Albert L.
    • Mathers, Frank Curry
    • McMillin, Alvin N. "Bo"
    • McNutt, Paul V.
    • Merrill, B. Winfred
    • Payne, Fernandus
    • Scheifley, Alfred
    • Swain, Joseph
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Young, Bert
    • Young, Grace
    • Subjects
    • faculty life
    • Indiana University physical plant
    • Prohibition

Interviewee
Martin, Wallace H. June 9, 1969 

Call Number
69-008

Physical Description

20 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 50 minutes; index

Interviewer
Cuffel, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open (oral Deed of Gift)

Scope and Content Note

Wallace H. Martin attended Indiana University in the years before World War I. Once the United States. entered the war, he went overseas and fought in France. After the war, Martin received his law degree and went on to practice in New York City for several decades. Martin discusses his Indiana University coursework and professors and also contemplates the effect the university had on his life.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Emanon Club
    • George Washington University
    • Indiana University
    • Indianapolis Star
    • New York University School of Law
    • Occupation Names
    • attorney
    • author
    • sergeant
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Nims, Harry D.
    • Woodburn, James A.
    • Place Names
    • Alto, Indiana
    • France
    • Kokomo, Indiana
    • New York, New York
    • Washington, DC
    • Subjects
    • Indiana University regional campuses
    • law school
    • town and gown relations
    • World War I
    • World War I battles

Interviewee
Mathers, Frank C. October 25, 1972 

Call Number
72-009

Call Number

50 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 120 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.; Day, Harry G.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Frank C. Mathers, professor emeritus at Indiana University, came to the university as an assistant in 1905. This interview outlines various experiences and contributions made by Mathers to the field of chemistry, specifically electroplating, including a method of creating fluorine gas upon which he had a patent. In addition, Mathers discusses fellow members of the Department of Chemistry at Indiana University, the administration under William Lowe Bryan and Herman B Wells, and life in Bloomington in the first years of the twentieth century.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Department of Chemistry
    • Sigma Xi
    • Family Names
    • Willkie
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Alter, Chester
    • Blough, Earl
    • Briscoe, Herman T. "Kay"
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Davis, Louis Sherman
    • Henke, Clyde Overbeck
    • Hitler, Adolf
    • Isobe, Paul F.
    • Lindley, Ernest H.
    • Lyons, Robert E.
    • Smith, Lee
    • Strope, Ben
    • Warner, John Christian
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • aluminum
    • electroplating
    • fluorine gas
    • World War I
    • World War II

Interviewee
Mathers, Frank Curry June, 1970 

Call Number
70-018

Physical Description

22 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 55 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara; Pickett, William

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Mathers discusses his work with fluorine and how this element was used as a weapon of war. He also discusses growing up on a farm in southern Indiana and his life at the university as an undergraduate and a professor.

Frank C. Mathers attended Indiana University as an undergraduate from 1899 to 1903. After graduation, he received his Ph.D. in chemistry from Cornell University and returned to Indiana University, becoming a full professor in 1923.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Cornell University
    • Indiana University
    • Indiana University Department of Chemistry
    • Occupation Names
    • chemistry professor
    • farmer
    • livestock trader
    • miner
    • physician
    • Personal Names
    • Brown, Oliver W.
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Foley, Arthur L.
    • Hitler, Adolf
    • Swain, Joseph
    • Place Names
    • Washington, DC
    • Subjects
    • 1898 Spanish-American War
    • 1918 Influenza Epidemic
    • atomic bomb
    • boarding houses
    • chemistry
    • cows
    • farming
    • fluorine gas
    • Great Depression
    • water shortages
    • weapons
    • World War I

Interviewee
Maurer, Mary Rieman June 7, 1969 

Call Number
69-013

Physical Description

28 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 65 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Cuffel, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Mary Rieman Maurer, born in 1895, attended Indiana University from 1912 to 1916, getting her degree in philosophy under the teaching of Dr. Ernest H. Lindley, her highly esteemed mentor. A teacher, former trustee of Indiana University, and treasurer of the Distinguished Alumni Service Club, Maurer was also an active member of the sorority, Kappa Alpha Theta, during her days as a student. In this interview, she discusses memories of Indiana University, student life and activities in the second decade of the twentieth century, and the administrations of William Lowe Bryan and Herman B Wells.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Kappa Alpha Theta
    • Occupation Names
    • teacher
    • trustee
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Howe, William David
    • Isobe, Paul F.
    • Lindley, Ernest H.
    • McNutt, Ruth J.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • campus life
    • racism
    • transportation
    • water shortages

Interviewee
McNutt, Ruth J. March 27, 1969 

Call Number
69-002

Physical Description

32 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 75 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open (oral Deed of Gift)

Scope and Content Note

Ruth J. McNutt's official title was secretary to William Lowe Bryan, the President of Indiana University, however, during her years in this position, she essentially acted as vice president of the university, even planning the university's budget. Miss McNutt discusses what it was like working for Bryan and how he dealt with faculty and students. She also discusses the situation with Mrs. Bryan, whom many thought to be an invalid and who took up a lot of Mr. Bryan's time. Due to this situation, Miss McNutt did all of the entertaining for the Bryans during her time on campus.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Board of Aeons
    • board of trustees
    • DePauw University
    • Indiana University
    • Occupation Names
    • chauffeur
    • secretary
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, Charlotte Lowe
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • McNutt, Paul V.
    • Ralston, William A.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • New York, New York
    • Subjects
    • commencement
    • student-faculty relations
    • university budget
    • university finances
    • university politics

Interviewee
Mogge, Arthur R.; Mogge, Arthur R., Mrs. June 9, 1969 

Call Number
69-018

Physical Description

29 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 70 minutes; no index; black and white photograph and negative

Interviewer
Cuffel, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Restricted

Scope and Content Note

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Mogge were students at Indiana University from 1915 to 1920. He went to Indiana University. after attending high school in Evansville, Indiana. She attended high school in Lafayette, Indiana. They describe their student life: transportation, faculty, administration, housing, social life, sports, water shortages (and how they affected bathing and laundry). They also talk about their involvement as alumni of the university.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Alpha Tau Omega
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Piercy, Joseph W.
    • Rawles, William A.
    • Stahr, Elvis J.
    • Stiehm, Ewald Ortwin "Jumbo"
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • advertising
    • campus life
    • Indiana University alumni
    • public relations
    • student protests
    • train travel
    • water supply

Interviewee
Nelson, Alice April 28, 1969 

Call Number
69-004

Physical Description

34 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 80 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.; Cuffel, Victoria

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

This interview with Alice Nelson covers her years at Indiana University in charge of residence halls. Arriving in 1920, she was given charge of the run-down women's dormitory at Alpha Hall. Initiating countless renovations to improve the few existing residence halls, Nelson also worked tirelessly to get many new residence halls built and to create a system of dining halls. She tells of the impact of World War I, the Great Depression, African-Americans at Indiana University, World War II, and the residential life at Indiana University.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University Alpha Hall
    • Occupation Names
    • women's residence halls director
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Louden, Theodore J.
    • Rich, Claude T.
    • Wells, Agnes E.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • co-educational housing
    • dining halls
    • diversity
    • Great Depression
    • housing
    • World War I
    • World War II

Interviewee
Nelson, Alice M. August 17, 1973 

Call Number
76-010

Physical Description

5 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips; no index; partially transcribed

Interviewer
Warriner, David

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Alice M. Nelson describes the housing of veterans on the campus of Indiana University just after World War II. Nelson died in 1978.

  • Keywords
    • Occupation Names
    • university administrator
    • Subjects
    • university housing
    • World War II veterans

Interviewee
Norvelle, Lee February 19, 1970 

Call Number
70-002

Physical Description

12 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 30 minutes; no index; partially transcribed

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Restricted

Scope and Content Note

Norvelle describes the speech department and theater at Indiana University in the nineteen twenties and nineteen thirties, during the presidency of William Lowe Bryan.

  • Keywords
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • McNutt, Ruth J.
    • Subjects
    • speech instruction
    • theater

Interviewee
Norvelle, Lee March 6, 1970 

Call Number
70-007

Physical Description

44 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 105 minutes; curriculum vitae

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Norvelle talks about several aspects of Indiana University life from his student days, like classes, boarding houses, and the water shortage. He then moves on to his career as a professor and focuses on the development of theater and opera at Indiana University and his role in the formation of Indiana University's Department of Speech and Theater.

Lee Norvelle attended Indiana University for one year as an undergraduate student, receiving his BA in 1921. He began teaching at Indiana University in 1925 and remained there until his retirement.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Asbury College
    • Indiana University Auditorium
    • Indiana University Department of Speech and Theater
    • Indiana University School of Music
    • Metropolitan Opera
    • Taylor University
    • United States Army
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Bain, Wilfred C.
    • Biddle, Ward G.
    • Book, William F.
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Carmichael, Hoagy
    • Halleck, Charles A.
    • Morrison, Henry Clay
    • Steele, T.C.
    • Stout, Selatie Edgar
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Brown County, Indiana
    • Kentucky
    • Subjects
    • Aida
    • Birth of a Nation
    • boarding houses
    • entertainment
    • psychology
    • smoking
    • speech
    • theater
    • water shortages

Interviewee
Orwig, Bill April 22, 1974 

Call Number
74-015

Physical Description

89 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 215 minutes, no index

Interviewer
Peterson, D. Scott

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Bill Orwig began his career as a teacher and a coach. In 1961, he came to Indiana University to serve as its athletic director. He discusses the state of Indiana athletics during his tenure there, focusing on problems with financial support, the challenge of recruiting, Indiana's athletic probation, and the place of student athletics within the university.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • NCAA
    • University of Nebraska
    • University of Toledo
    • Occupation Names
    • athletic director
    • insurance agent
    • teacher
    • Personal Names
    • Bell, G. Sam
    • Pont, John
    • Place Names
    • Toledo, Ohio
    • Subjects
    • athletic boycott
    • athletic facilities fee
    • athletic recruiting
    • basketball
    • Big Ten
    • financial support
    • football
    • hockey
    • income sport
    • Indiana University alumni
    • probation
    • soccer
    • student athletes
    • underwriting
    • University student athletics
    • varsity club
    • women's athletics
    • World War II

Interviewee
Payne, Fernandus October 8, 1968; October 12, 1968; October 15, 1968; November 2, 1968 

Call Number
68-002

Physical Description

98 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 240 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.; Winther, Oscar O.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Payne discusses his own work in zoology and biology and that of his colleagues, the William Lowe Bryan administration, various university departments and their curriculums, and other aspects of the university's academic and social life.

Fernandus Payne attended Indiana University as an undergraduate starting in 1902. After obtaining his Ph.D., he returned to Indiana University as an assistant professor in zoology. Payne remained at Indiana for the rest of his career, eventually becoming Dean of the Graduate School.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • board of trustees
    • Columbia University
    • Johns Hopkins University
    • Purdue University
    • Stanford University
    • Valparaiso Normal School
    • Woods Hole Research Center
    • Occupation Names
    • graduate school dean
    • ichthyologist
    • professor
    • teacher
    • zoologist
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Dabney, Richard Heath
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Harding, Samuel Bannister
    • Jordan, David Starr
    • Kohlmeier, Albert L.
    • McNutt, Ruth J.
    • Morgan, Thomas Hunt
    • Sampson, Martin Wright
    • Scout, Selatie E.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Wilson, E.B.
    • Woodburn, James A.
    • Zeleny, Charles
    • Subjects
    • agriculture
    • biological station
    • biology
    • cells
    • chromosomes
    • curriculum
    • Drosophila
    • equipment
    • fraternities
    • graduate placement
    • ichthyology
    • inbreeding
    • medical school
    • psychology
    • religion
    • retirement
    • taxonomy
    • town and gown relations
    • zoology

Interviewee
Peak, Philip July 17, 1974 

Call Number
74-016

Physical Description

23 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 55 minutes; no index; small photo of interviewee

Interviewer
Warriner, David

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1908, Philip Peak, a former chair of the Math Department and professor in the School of Education, came to Indiana University in 1942. He discusses the impact of World War II on Indiana University, emphasizing in particular the effects of the influx of World War II veterans into the Indiana University system. With regard to these veterans, Peak speaks of their contributions to classes, changes in Bloomington society, veterans' housing, and the excellence of married veteran students. Throughout the course of the interview, he discusses with approval the attitudes and changes that were brought into Indiana University classrooms by the GIs.

  • Keywords
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Wright, Wendell W. "Whack"
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • married students
    • university growth
    • veterans
    • veterans' housing
    • World War II

Interviewee
Peterson, J. Dwight June 9, 1969 

Call Number
69-009

Physical Description

31 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 70 minutes; index

Interviewer
Cuffel, Victoria; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

J. Dwight Peterson, born in 1897, was an Indiana University student from 1919, with a brief interruption when he enlisted in the military during World War I. Earning his A.B. in economics later in 1919, Peterson went on to a successful career in business, served as an Indiana University trustee from 1937 to 1945, and was treasurer of the Indiana University Foundation for many years. In this interview, he discusses his years as an Indiana University student, his fellow African-American students, campus social life, water shortages, and the impact of World War II on the university. In addition, Peterson speaks of the growth of the university campus housing in the post-World War II period, and the method used for financing this building spurt.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University Foundation
    • Sigma Delta Chi
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Rawles, William A.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • campus life
    • housing
    • student life
    • university growth
    • water shortages
    • World War II

Interviewee
Phillips, Ardith L. June, 1970 

Call Number
70-021

Physical Description

31 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 75 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Ardith L. Phillips, Indiana University alumnus from the class of 1920 was, through the course of his career, a high school teacher, coach of various sports at both the high school and college levels, and a college professor. He discusses his life as an Indiana University student in the early twentieth century, recalling the 1918 Influenza Epidemic in Bloomington, social life, and basketball memories. In addition, Phillips tells of the impact of World War I, the Great Depression, and diversity at Indiana University. Throughout the interview, he traces the changes that teacher education, physical education, and athletics have undergone through the decades.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Ball State University
    • Phi Kappa Psi
    • Student Army Training Corps
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • teacher
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • 1918 Influenza Epidemic
    • basketball
    • diversity
    • Great Depression
    • physical education
    • student life
    • World War I

Interviewee
Prickett, Alva L. October 24, 1969 

Call Number
68-003

Physical Description

31 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 70 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.; Winther, Oscar O.

Access Status

Restricted

Scope and Content Note

Alva L. Prickett, born in 1890, was Dean of the School of Business at Indiana University starting in 1919. He talks about student life, business school curriculum, and funding for higher education. Prickett retired in 1960.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana Daily Student
    • Ku Klux Klan
    • School of Business
    • Occupation Names
    • farmer
    • School of Business dean
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Rawles, William A.
    • Weatherly, Ulysses G.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • agriculture
    • fraternity hazing
    • Great Depression
    • higher education funding
    • World War II
    • World War II veterans

Interviewee
Shaffer, Robert July 17, 1974 

Call Number
74-017

Physical Description

25 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips; 60 minutes.; no index; rough transcript

Interviewer
Warriner, David

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Shaffer describes the impact of returning veterans on the university and the services provided to them.

Dr. Robert H. Shaffer, born in 1915, was a native of Delphi, Indiana, and was formerly chair of the Department of Higher Education in the School of Education at Indiana University. After World War II, Shaffer was an assistant dean of students at Indiana University and director of it veterans' guidance center.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • American Legion
    • American Veterans Committee
    • Occupation Names
    • university administrator
    • Personal Names
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Wright, Wendell W. "Whack"
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • student life
    • university housing
    • World War II
    • World War II veterans

Interviewee
Shrock, Robert R. April 20, 1972 

Call Number
72-013

Physical Description

45 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 105 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Robert Shrock was born in Miami County, Indiana in 1904, and attended school there before attending high school in Kokomo, Indiana. He attended Indiana University and studied geology there in the nineteen twenties. Schrock describes student life and the atmosphere in Bloomington during that time. He also describes faculty members with whom he worked.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Bloomington Telephone
    • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • University of Wisconsin
    • Occupation Names
    • geologist
    • paleontologist
    • Personal Names
    • Bradfute, Blaine
    • Briscoe, Herman T. "Kay"
    • Bryan, William Jennings
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Carmichael, Hoagy
    • Cummings, Edgar Roscoe
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Kinsey, Alfred C.
    • Malotte, Clyde Arnett
    • Merrill, B. Winfred
    • Moenkhaus, William J.
    • Payne, Fernandus
    • Senour, Frank
    • Stempel, Guido H.
    • Visher, Stephen Sargent
    • Weatherwax, Paul
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Wawpepong, Wisconsin
    • Subjects
    • dams
    • geology
    • philanthropy
    • student life
    • water shortages

Interviewee
Snow, Charles Wilbert May 2, 1970 

Call Number
70-009

Physical Description

36 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 85 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

In this interview, Snow discusses a wide variety of topics and acquaintances, including Amos S. Hershey, Hoagy Carmichael, Alfred C. Kinsey, folk ballads, politics, women's rights, and professors' salaries, among many others. His insightful comments and memories add depth to historical figures and events and tie them to Indiana University.

Charles Wilbert Snow, a professor, politician, poet, folklorist and veteran of World War I, served on the academic faculty in the English Department at Indiana University from 1916 to 1921. Between these years, Snow taught with a brief interruption when he enlisted and served in World War I.

  • Keywords
    • Occupation Names
    • folklorist
    • poet
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Bourdin, Henry L.
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Campbell, Olive D.
    • Carmichael, Hoagy
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Hershey, Amos S.
    • Howe, William David
    • Howells, William Dean
    • Hyde, William Dewitt
    • Jordan, David Starr
    • Kinsey, Alfred C.
    • Marshall, Thomas R.
    • Robinson, Edwin Arlington
    • Sembower, Charles J.
    • Sharp, Cecil
    • Smoot, Reed
    • Swedenborg, Emanuel
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Seward Peninsula, Alaska
    • Spruce Head, Maine
    • Subjects
    • faculty salaries
    • folk ballads
    • fraternities
    • pollution
    • women's rights
    • World War I

Interviewee
Sollitt, Ralph V. June 22, 1971-June 23, 1971 

Call Number
71-039

Physical Description

68 pages; 3 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 165 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

In this interview, Sollitt discusses his life as a student at Indiana University in the early twentieth century, remembering many acquaintances and friendships with some of Indiana University's most renowned names, including William and Charlotte Lowe Bryan, Carl H. Eigenmann, and Harold W. Johnston. In addition, he speaks of his active days in national politics in the nineteen twenties and nineteen thirties and the men with whom he worked.

Born in 1888, Ralph V. Sollitt earned his A.B. degree in 1910 from Indiana University and his L.L.B. degree in law in 1911, also from Indiana University. Although trained as a attorney, Sollitt's career was steered into different directions; he became the Alumni Secretary at Indiana University shortly after earning his degree in law, and later became influential in politics and became the president of a major advertising agency.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University Memorial Union
    • Indiana University Student Union board
    • Lord and Thomas Advertising Agency
    • Family Names
    • Willkie
    • Occupation Names
    • advertising executive
    • alumni secretary
    • attorney
    • Personal Names
    • Atwater, Amzi
    • Barnhart, Dean
    • Beveridge, Albert
    • Bryan, Charlotte Lowe
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Conwell, Russell
    • Cummings, Edgar Roscoe
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Ewing, Oscar R.
    • Fesler, James W.
    • Harding, Samuel Bannister
    • Harding, Warren G.
    • Hays, Will Harrison
    • Herold, Don
    • Hershey, Amos S.
    • Johnston, Harold W.
    • Marshall, Thomas R.
    • McNutt, Paul V.
    • Sembower, Charles J.
    • Whittenberger, John M.
    • Willkie, Wendell L.
    • Woodburn, James A.
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • advertising
    • college traditions
    • national politics
    • student life
    • World War I

Interviewee
Solt, Leo F.; Baxter, Maurice G.; McGarr, Philip M.; Harris, William H.; Wilson, William E. May 3, 1973 

Call Number
73-021

Physical Description

21 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 50 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Mooney, Chase C.; Memorial Service

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

As a transcript of the Chase C. Mooney Memorial Service, this document encompasses sentiments, memories, and traits of the late Chase C. Mooney, a distinguished professor of the Indiana University Department of History. Beloved by both colleagues and students, Mooney is remembered here through anecdotes and some of his favorite literary passages.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University Department of History
    • Occupation Names
    • history professor
    • Personal Names
    • Crawford, William H.
    • Mooney, Chase C.
    • Subjects
    • Civil Rights Movement

Interviewee
Solt, Leo F.; Wells, Herman B; Glad, Paul; Mooney, Chase C. May 28, 1970 

Call Number
70-010

Physical Description

15 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 35 minutes; no index; two photos

Interviewer
Winther, Oscar Osburn; Memorial Service

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

This transcript of the Oscar Osburn Winther Memorial Service includes words from Leo F. Solt, Herman B Wells, Paul Glad, and Chase C. Mooney. Within the transcript, Winther's contributions to Indiana University's Department of History and to the field of history are emphasized. In addition, his founding of the Indiana University Oral History Department and his many positive personal and professional qualities are discussed.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Journal of American History
    • Department of History
    • Occupation Names
    • history professor
    • Personal Names
    • Winther, Mary
    • Winther, Oscar Osburn
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • oral history

Interviewee
Stahr, Elvis J. November 5, 1968; December 21, 1968 

Call Number
68-004

Physical Description

58 pages; 3 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 140 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Elvis J. Stahr, president of Indiana University from 1962 until 1968, discusses his years at the university. Stahr reveals opinions about Indiana University's growth and the importance of maintaining a first-rate faculty. He recalls the impact made upon the university campus by the Civil Rights Movement, black and white extremist groups, and protests against the Vietnam War. In addition, Stahr speaks of Indiana University's sources of funding and how this funding allowed for the increased growth of the university in the nineteen sixties.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • DuBois Society
    • Indiana University Press
    • Occupation Names
    • university president
    • Personal Names
    • Branigan, Roger D.
    • Rich, Claude T.
    • Rusk, Dean
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • Civil Rights Movement
    • federal education funding
    • higher education funding
    • Indiana University administration
    • residence halls
    • university growth
    • Vietnam War protests

Interviewee
Stempel, John E. February 24, 1976 

Call Number
77-014

Physical Description

35 pages; 1 cassette, 1 7/8 ips, 80 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Taylor, Bobbie

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

John Emmert Stempel, born in 1903, describes his student days at Indiana University and as a member of the School of Journalism faculty. He describes water shortages and transportation to Bloomington, including the founding of the municipal airport. Stempel describes his career as a Journalist, Bloomington newspapers, and fundraising activities.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Bloomington Airport
    • Bloomington Evening World
    • Bloomington Religious Times
    • Bloomington Star
    • Bloomington Telephone
    • Community Chest
    • Courier
    • Indiana Daily Student
    • New York Sun
    • Showers Brothers Furniture Company
    • United Fund
    • United Way of America
    • Family Names
    • Stempel
    • Occupation Names
    • journalist
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Arpan, Floyd
    • Esarey, Logan
    • Farmer, Eli P.
    • Pyle, Ernie
    • Stempel, John D.
    • Stempel, Mary Farmer
    • Stiehm, Ewald Ortwin "Jumbo"
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Griffy Creek, Indiana
    • Griffy Creek Reservoir, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • basketball
    • football
    • fundraising
    • journalism
    • linguistics
    • newspapers
    • philology
    • railroads
    • university housing
    • water shortages
    • water supply

Interviewee
Stempel, John E. April, 1970 

Call Number
70-004

Physical Description

73 pages; 3 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 170 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1903, John E. Stempel was a 1923 alumnus of Indiana University who returned to the university as an instructor in journalism in 1926 and 1927. He joined the faculty in the Department of Journalism in 1936, where he taught until his retirement in 1968. Stempel recalls his years as a student at Indiana University, the accompanying water shortages, and his fellow students. He describes life in Bloomington and life on the Indiana University campus throughout his years there, including the effects of the Great Depression and the presence of African-American students. In addition, Stempel relates anecdotes of his associations with many of Indiana University's elite, including William Lowe Bryan, Herman B Wells, and Ward G. Biddle.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana Daily Student
    • Indiana University Department of Journalism
    • Kappa Alpha Psi
    • Press Club
    • Sigma Delta Chi
    • Occupation Names
    • editor
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Biddle, Ward G.
    • Briscoe, Herman T. "Kay"
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Crone, Frank L.
    • Field, Oliver
    • Foley, Arthur L.
    • Harding, Samuel Bannister
    • Harper, Fowler V.
    • Herold, Don
    • Johnson, Fred Bates
    • Louden, Theodore J.
    • Mellett, Don
    • Payne, Fernandus
    • Pittenger, Nicholas
    • Pyle, Ernie
    • Stempel, Guido H.
    • Swain, Joseph
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • community life
    • Great Depression
    • transportation
    • water shortages
    • World War II

Interviewee
Stempel, John E. November 19, 1979; January 21, 1980; January 28, 1980; February 4, 1980; February 11, 1980 

Call Number
79-070

Physical Description

196 pages; 6 reels, 1 7/8 ips, 620 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Giroux, Vincent A., Jr.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1903, John E. Stempel was a 1923 alumnus of Indiana University who returned to the university as an instructor in journalism in 1926 and 1927. He joined the Indiana University faculty as a member of the Department of Journalism in 1936 where he taught until his retirement in 1968. Stempel recalls his years as a student at the university, his involvement with the Indiana Daily Student and Sigma Delta Chi, water shortages, and Bloomington life in general. He describes his career as a journalist in New York City, Pennsylvania, and his eventual choice to teach at Indiana University. Stempel discusses Prohibition, the Great Depression, the expansion of the university campus, faculty, and student body, segregation and integration, the Ku Klux Klan, and the effects of all of these phenomena on Bloomington and Indiana University.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • American Council on Education for Journalism
    • Arbutus
    • Bloomington Evening World
    • Columbia University
    • Department of Journalism
    • Easton Express
    • High School Journalism Institute
    • Indiana Daily Student
    • Indiana University Department of Radio and Television
    • Ku Klux Klan
    • Lafayette College
    • New York Sun
    • The Optimist
    • Phi Kappa Psi
    • RCA
    • Rotary Club
    • Sigma Delta Chi
    • YMCA
    • Family Names
    • Cravens
    • Occupation Names
    • journalist
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Biddle, Ward G.
    • Bradford, Walter
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Cravens, John W.
    • Cravens, Oscar
    • Feltus, H.J.
    • Wagner, Paul
    • Wells, Clifford
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Easton, Pennsylvania
    • New York, New York
    • Subjects
    • 1944 GI Bill
    • African-Americans
    • basketball
    • campus life
    • Flesch formula
    • fraternities
    • Great Depression
    • integration
    • newspapers
    • offset printing
    • Prohibition
    • readability testing
    • segregation
    • television broadcasting
    • transportation
    • university growth
    • water shortages
    • World War II

Interviewee
Strack, William N. June 5, 1970 

Call Number
70-015

Physical Description

29 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 70 minutes; index; 1 song sheet, large photo of interviewee

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Pickett, William B.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Strack discusses his years as a student at Indiana University, including student housing, water shortages, and social life at the university. He also talks of the creation of the School of Law and the School of Music at Indiana University, and of some of the major influences he saw at the university, including Herman B Wells and Claude T. Rich. Strack also tells of his closeness to his professor, Albert L. Kohlmeier.

William N. Strack, born in 1893, was a successful attorney who received his A.B. degree in economics from Indiana University in 1915 and his L.L.B. (law) degree in 1917 from Indiana University. He earned both of these degrees before enlisting in the military for service in World War I.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University School of Law
    • Indiana University School of Music
    • Occupation Names
    • attorney
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Geiger, Jack
    • Hepburn, Charles McGuffey
    • Hogate, Enoch George
    • Kohlmeier, Albert L.
    • Rich, Claude T.
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • housing
    • student life
    • water shortages
    • World War I

Interviewee
Stuart, James A. June, 1970 

Call Number
70-017

Physical Description

18 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 45 minutes; index; biographical sketch, article

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara; Pickett, William

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

James A. Stuart was born in Bloomington, Indiana in 1880 and attended Indiana University from 1897 to 1901. After graduation, Stuart entered a career in the newspaper business and spent the majority of his years as an editor for the Indianapolis Star. He briefly discusses academics at the university and what campus life was like when he was a student.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Bloomington High School
    • Indiana University Department of English
    • Indianapolis Star
    • Muncie Star
    • Sigma Delta Chi
    • Occupation Names
    • editor
    • groundskeeper
    • laborer
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Jordan, David Starr
    • Lindley, Ernest H.
    • Pullian, Eugene C.
    • Sutton, Elmer
    • Swain, Joseph
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Muncie, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • 1898 Spanish-American War

Interviewee
Sulzer, Elmer G. December 18, 1968 

Call Number
68-009

Physical Description

29 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 70 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Sulzer discusses Prohibition and student life with regard to his earlier days at Indiana University. He also talks about campus and academic growth, the increasing internationalism of the university, and the impact of the nineteen sixties on campus.

Elmer Sulzer attended Indiana University as an undergraduate for one year, from 1920 to 1921. He went on to teach at the University of Kentucky, eventually becoming head of the Department of Radio. In 1952, he returned to Indiana University to serve as the head of its Department of Radio and Television.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • DePauw University
    • Indiana University Band
    • University of Kentucky
    • University of Kentucky Department of Radio
    • Occupation Names
    • band director
    • public relations director
    • teacher
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • McVey, Frank LeRond
    • Stahr, Elvis J.
    • Visher, Stephen Sargent
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Subjects
    • campus growth
    • geology
    • homeopathy
    • militancy
    • nineteen sixties
    • nineteen twenties
    • Prohibition
    • provincialism
    • railroads
    • state schools
    • student life
    • teaching

Interviewee
Thompson, Stith November 10, 1968 

Call Number
68-005

Physical Description

36 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 85 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas; Winther, Oscar

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Thompson discusses the Indiana University curriculum, town and gown relations, salaries, faculty, and the university administration. He mentions a large number of professors and administrators, especially William Lowe Bryan.

Stith Thompson arrived at Indiana University as an English professor in 1921. He remained at Indiana University for the rest of his career, serving as Dean of the Graduate School from 1947 to 1950.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Department of English
    • Harvard University
    • Indiana University Faculty Club
    • Indiana University Folklore Institute
    • Indiana University Press
    • Yale University
    • Family Names
    • Merrill
    • Stempel
    • Occupation Names
    • dean
    • professor
    • teacher
    • Personal Names
    • Alexander, William A. "Red"
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Haskins, Charles
    • Hershey, Amos S.
    • Howe, William David
    • Kinsey, Alfred C.
    • McNutt, Ruth J.
    • Mottier, David Myers
    • Muller, Herman
    • Payne, Fernandus
    • Rea, John
    • Roberts, Elizabeth Mattocks
    • Sembower, Charles J.
    • Senour, Frank
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Woodburn, James A.
    • Place Names
    • Kentucky
    • Subjects
    • divorce
    • folklore
    • fraternities
    • freshman composition
    • Great Depression
    • inbreeding
    • Indiana University administration
    • pensions
    • Prohibition
    • salaries
    • social life
    • sororities
    • town and gown relations
    • transportation

Interviewee
Thornburg, William D. May 29, 1969 

Call Number
69-006

Physical Description

30 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 70 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.; Cuffel, Victoria

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

William Thornburg received his BA from Indiana University in the early nineteen twenties and became a geology professor at Indiana in 1928. He spends a lot of the interview discussing the problems of a water shortage on campus and how these problems were remedied. Thornburg also spends some time discussing his colleagues at Indiana University and what life was like when he was an undergraduate on campus.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Book Nook
    • Central Normal College
    • Indiana University Department of Geology
    • Student Army Training Corps
    • Occupation Names
    • geologist
    • professor
    • Personal Names
    • Allen, Ward
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Carmichael, Hoagy
    • Cummings, Edgar Roscoe
    • Logan, William N.
    • McNutt, Paul V.
    • Moffet, Archie
    • Visher, Stephen Sargent
    • Place Names
    • Griffy Creek Reservoir, Indiana
    • Lake Monroe, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • cisterns
    • Great Depression
    • Indiana Geological Survey
    • kaolin
    • limestone
    • malaria
    • town and gown relations
    • water shortages
    • water springs
    • water supply
    • World War I

Interviewee
Von Tress, Edward C. November 24, 1969 

Call Number
69-040

Physical Description

11 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 25 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Von Tress talks about his years at Indiana University as an undergraduate, the impact of World War I, and William Lowe Bryan. He also discusses what it was like trying to raise money for the Indiana University Memorial Fund Campaign.

Edward Von Tress attended Indiana University as an undergraduate starting in 1916. He remained involved with the university by acting as the alumni secretary.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Army ROTC
    • Indiana University Memorial Fund Campaign
    • Student Army Training Corps
    • Occupation Names
    • alumni secretary
    • biologist
    • Personal Names
    • Alexander, William A. "Red"
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Warner, Archie
    • Subjects
    • blind fish
    • golf
    • Indiana University alumni
    • squirrels
    • trees
    • World War I

Interviewee
Von Tress, Edward C. December 12, 1972 

Call Number
72-007

Physical Description

33 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 75 minutes; no index; photo of interviewee

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Edward C. Von Tress, born in 1899, was a 1921 Indiana University alumnus. In this interview, he discusses the role he played when he returned to Indiana University in 1923 to become Alumni Secretary. Of central importance in his memories of this position is the Memorial Fund, a financial drive for pledges from both students and alumni. This fund, and Von Tress's activities for the fund, are directly related to the growing dream of creating a truly great institution at Indiana University. Throughout the interview, Von Tress relates anecdotes of friends and colleagues, including John S. Hastings, James S. Adams, U. Z. McMurtrie, and Herman B Wells.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Curtis Publishing Company
    • Flying Squadron
    • Family Names
    • McNutt
    • Occupation Names
    • alumni secretary
    • Personal Names
    • Adams, James S.
    • Alexander, William A. "Red"
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Hastings, John S.
    • Heighway, George "Dixie"
    • McMurtrie, U.Z.
    • McNutt, Kathleen
    • McNutt, Paul V.
    • Metz, Arthur R.
    • Riley, James Whitcomb
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Wildermuth, Ora L.
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • Indiana University alumni
    • memorial fund

Interviewee
Wallace, Leon H. May 2, 1969 

Call Number
69-005

Physical Description

31 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 70 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Leon H. Wallace, born in 1904, discusses the history of the School of Law at Indiana University. First, the origins of Indiana University are outlined. In addition, Wallace speaks of the differing qualifications necessary to practice as a attorney over the past century and a half in different areas of the United States, including the state of Indiana. He discusses the introduction of accreditation to various law schools, and the development of the law program at Indiana University.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • American Bar Association
    • Association of American Law Schools
    • Indiana State Legislature
    • Indiana University School of Law
    • Occupation Names
    • attorney
    • law professor
    • Personal Names
    • Harrison, William Henry
    • Hepburn, Charles McGuffey
    • Jennings, Jonathan E.
    • McDonald, David
    • Read, Daniel
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Indiana
    • Subjects
    • 1851 Indiana State Constitution
    • accreditation
    • attorneys

Interviewee
Warren, Winifred Merrill May 27, 1969 

Call Number
69-007

Physical Description

28 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 65 minutes; index; photos, essay

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Winifred Merrill Warren, a teacher in the Music Department at Indiana University from the mid nineteen twenties until the second half of the twentieth century, discusses the beginnings of the Music Department and the Music School. In particular, Mrs. Warren emphasizes the deeds of her father, B.Winfred Merrill, a renowned musician and conductor who came to Indiana University and virtually created the Music Department from nothing. She also mentions the music building. She talks of how presidents William Lowe Bryan and Herman B Wells affected the growth of music at Indiana University.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University Department of Music
    • Indiana University School of Music
    • Family Names
    • Merrill
    • Occupation Names
    • music professor
    • musician
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Campbell, Charles Diven
    • Hoffzimmer, Ernest
    • Merrill, B. Winfred
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana

Interviewee
Weathers, Cecil; Weathers, Cecil, Mrs. June 13, 1971 

Call Number
71-017

Physical Description

40 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 95 minutes; index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Peterson, D. Scott

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Weathers, alumni of Indiana University, discuss their lives as married students at the university, including information about their housing, board, transportation, health care, and professors. In addition, the Weathers comment on their experiences teaching in the state of Indiana, especially in the nineteen twenties. Mr. Weathers speaks of the effects of the Great Depression on the business community, of which he was a part throughout his career in the securities business. Indiana University figures including Kenneth P. Williams and Charles J. Sembower are mentioned in the Weathers' memories of the university.

  • Keywords
    • Occupation Names
    • teacher
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Sembower, Charles J.
    • Williams, Kenneth P.
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • African-Americans
    • discipline in education
    • Great Depression
    • health care
    • housing
    • railroads
    • room and board
    • teaching
    • university requirements
    • World War I

Interviewee
Weatherwax, Paul March 5, 1969 

Call Number
69-001

Physical Description

30 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 70 minutes; index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Paul Weatherwax received his BA from Indiana University in the 1910s and returned to Bloomington as a botany professor in 1921. He talks about the changes that took place between the Bryan and Wells administrations. He also discusses campus life during his time as a student here and about tensions between other professors that existed during his teaching years.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University College of Arts and Sciences
    • Occupation Names
    • professor
    • teacher
    • teaching assistant
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Cummings, Edgar Roscoe
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Hoffman, Horace A.
    • Mottier, David Myers
    • Rothrock, David A.
    • Stout, Selatie Edgar
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Willkie, Wendell L.
    • Place Names
    • Thailand
    • Subjects
    • boarding houses
    • botany
    • campus radicalism
    • retirement
    • student life
    • trees
    • zoology

Interviewee
Wells, Herman B January, 1968 

Call Number
68-001

Physical Description

42 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 100 minutes; index; small photo of interviewee

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas D.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Born in 1902, Herman B Wells, former president of Indiana University, discusses the controversial Kinsey research, papers, and Institute. Wells speaks of the origin of the idea for Kinsey's research, the progression of Kinsey's marriage classes, Kinsey's book, and eventually the Kinsey Institute. Also included is Wells' description of the university's stand throughout the controversy; for example, Indiana University's response to a protesting letter from a Catholic bishop is discussed.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana University Board of Trustees
    • Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction
    • Occupation Names
    • university president
    • Personal Names
    • Huxley, Julian
    • Kinsey, Alfred C.
    • Tello, Juan
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • Kinsey marriage class
    • Kinsey research

Interviewee
Wells, Herman B March 6, 1971; March 10, 1971 

Call Number
71-007

Physical Description

90 pages; 4 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 215 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Clark, Thomas; Collins, Dorothy

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Wells primarily discusses his tenure as president, comparing his administration to that of William Lowe Bryan's and discussing the impact that other universities had on his management style, the teaching and roles of various professors, and the improvements and changes that came to Indiana University during his years as president.

Herman B Wells, born 1902, died 2000, attended Indiana University as an undergraduate. After an initial career in banking, he returned to Indiana University to serve as a professor, Dean of the Business School, and then, the University's president.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Indiana Bankers Association
    • Indiana General Assembly
    • Indiana University Lilly Library
    • Kelley School of Business
    • Time
    • United Nations Relief and Works Agency
    • Occupation Names
    • attorney
    • banker
    • dean
    • farmer
    • legislator
    • professor
    • teacher
    • university president
    • Personal Names
    • Bartley, E. Ross
    • Biddle, Ward G.
    • Briscoe, Herman T. "Kay"
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Coffman, Lotus
    • Edwards, Edward E.
    • Elliott, Edward
    • Harper, Fowler V.
    • Hastings, John S.
    • Hutchins, Robert M.
    • Jordan, David Starr
    • McKinley, Richard
    • McNutt, Paul V.
    • Swain, Joseph
    • Thompson, Stith
    • Subjects
    • faculty clubs
    • intellectualism
    • lending acts
    • Marshall Plan
    • politics
    • rare books
    • retirement
    • salaries
    • self study survey
    • student leadership
    • universities
    • university finances
    • World War II

Interviewee
Wells, Herman B June 16, 1976 

Call Number
76-054

Physical Description

10 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 25 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Weaver, Bill L.

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

Herman B Wells, former president of Indiana University, describes the University's efforts to bring European scholars to the United States, particularly those who had a difficult time due to the rise of totalitarian governments in their home countries. Wells was born in 1902 and died in 2000.

  • Keywords
    • Personal Names
    • Hlavaty, Vaclav
    • Hopf, Eberhard
    • Kronenberger, Albrecht
    • Manes, Alfred
    • Yusufzai, Baqi
    • Yusufzai, Olga Hlavaty
    • Place Names
    • Afghanistan
    • Czechoslovakia
    • Nigeria
    • Subjects
    • émigrés
    • language instruction

Interviewee
Wilson, Lucia A. Showalter June 12, 1971 

Interviewee
71-018

Physical Description

44 pages; 2 reels, 3 3/4 ips, 105 minutes; no index

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Peterson, D. Scott

Access Status

Restricted

Scope and Content Note

Lucia Wilson, née Showalter, received an A.B. degree from Indiana University in 1922. She describes campus life and courtship with her future husband, Stuart Wilson. She also describes professors with whom she worked. Wilson compares her undergraduate days to those of 1947 and 1948, when she and her husband returned to Indiana University for graduate school.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Cosmopolitan Club
    • Culver Military Academy
    • Indiana University Alpha Hall
    • Lee, Higginson and Company
    • Radford Normal School
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Edmondson, Frank K.
    • Eigenmann, Carl H.
    • Rawles, William A.
    • Weatherly, Ulysses G.
    • Wilson, Stuart
    • Woodburn, Janet
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • student health
    • student life

Interviewee
Young, John L. June 13, 1971 

Call Number
71-016

Physical Description

28 pages; 1 reel, 3 3/4 ips, 65 minutes; index; photo of interviewee, brief biography of interviewee

Interviewer
Benson, Barbara E.; Peterson, D. Scott

Access Status

Open

Scope and Content Note

John L. Young, born in 1899, earned his undergraduate degree from Indiana University in 1921, graduating with the university's first class from its School of Business. Enlisted in the military during World War I, Young went on to a very successful career as an engineer. Within the interview, iron ore mining, smelting, and the creation of steel are described. Young recalls Indiana University from his standpoint as a student, remembering William Lowe Bryan, Herman B Wells, with whom he graduated, the campus, diversity, and various academic requirements.

  • Keywords
    • Corporation Names
    • Alpha Tau Omega
    • Timken Roller Company
    • Occupation Names
    • engineer
    • Personal Names
    • Bryan, William Lowe
    • Wells, Herman B
    • Place Names
    • Bloomington, Indiana
    • Duluth, Minnesota
    • Evansville, Indiana
    • Subjects
    • academic requirements
    • African-Americans
    • band
    • campus life
    • diversity
    • films
    • iron ore mining
    • steel production
    • World War I