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Brevier Legislative Reports, Volume XXI, 1883, 311 pp.
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I AM A REPRESENTATIVE OF THE PEOPLE,

not of corporations nor cabals, money and monopoly, but of the people, and when I plead for the letter and the spirit of the Constitution, I am, with whatever ability I can command, championing the cause of the people. Strike down the Constitution, weaken it in any of its provisions, and you not only mar its symmetry but you dwarf its protecting power. All the rights and privileges of the people center in the Constitution in standing by the Constitution, entering my earnest protest against any infraction of its decrees, I am in the broadest and highest conception of the term. the friend of the people. When the people of Indiana learn, as they will learn, that the last General Assembly disobeyed the Constitution they will be in no mood to approve of such dereliction of duty. The people demand, when their Constitution is amended, that it shall be done constitutionally. They want no unconstitutional laws. Nor do they demand unconstitutional amendments. While the people of Indiana are a matter of fact people they are intelligent, discriminating and conservative. It is no compliment to Indiana to intimate, here or elsewhere, that her people rather than wait, would prefer to see the Constitution violated. Such a stigma is undeserved. Loyalty to the Constitution is one of the resplendent virtues of our people, and should this General Assembly, by its vote, defy its power, the people of Indiana, with a sterner voice than has hitherto marked their indignation, will rectify the wrong.

Mr. Chairman, I see in this amendment question but one course to pursue, and I felicitate myself, that in deciding to take that course, I am sustained by the Constitution, by my convictions and judgment, and I am equally gratified to say that the more I have examined the subject the more firmly I am intrenched in the conclusion that the amendments which were before the last General Assembly have not been Constitutionally referred to this body for future action, and I am persuaded that no benefits can accrue to the State by a violation of its fundamental law. I do not pretend to be endowed with any special gift of prescience, but to my perceptions only embarrassments complications and vexations can result from deliberate violations of the Constitutions. Here, in our capacity of law makers, no example

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